liquid glucose


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liq·uid glu·cose

a pharmaceutic aid consisting of dextrose, dextrins, maltose, and water, obtained by the incomplete hydrolysis of starch.

liquid glucose

a thick, syrupy, odorless and colorless or yellowish liquid obtained by the incomplete hydrolysis of starch, primarily consisting of dextrose with dextrins, maltose, and water. It is used as a flavoring agent and may be used as a calorie source, chiefly in treating dehydration.

liq·uid glu·cose

(lik'wid glū'kōs)
Pharmaceutic aid consisting of dextrose, dextrins, maltose, and water, obtained by the incomplete hydrolysis of starch.

liq·uid glu·cose

(likwid glūkōs)
Pharmaceutic aid consisting of dextrose, dextrins, maltose, and water, obtained by incomplete hydrolysis of starch.

glucose, d-glucose

a simple sugar, a monosaccharide in certain foodstuffs, especially fruit, and in normal blood; the major source of energy for many living organisms. See also dextrose.
Glucose, whose molecular formula is C6H12O6, is the end product of carbohydrate digestion; other monosaccharides (fructose and galactose) are largely converted into glucose. Glucose is the only monosaccharide present in significant amounts in the body fluids. The oxidation of glucose produces energy for the body cells; the rate of metabolism is controlled by a number of hormones the most important of which are insulin and glucagon. Glucose that is not needed for energy is stored in the form of glycogen as a source of potential energy, readily available when needed. Most of the glycogen is stored in the liver and muscle cells. When these and other body cells are saturated with glycogen, the excess glucose is converted into fat and stored as adipose tissue. See also hypoglycemia, hyperglycemia.

[1-14C]-glucose
radioactive glucose used experimentally.
liquid glucose
a thick syrupy, sweet liquid, consisting chiefly of dextrose, with dextrins, maltose and water, obtained by incomplete hydrolysis of starch; used as a flavoring agent, as a food, and in the treatment of dehydration.
glucose-1-phosphate
an intermediate in carbohydrate metabolism.
glucose-6-phosphatase
a liver (and kidney) enzyme that irreversibly cleaves glucose-6-phosphate to free glucose and phosphate; important in glucose homeostasis.
glucose-6-phosphate
an intermediate in carbohydrate metabolism.
glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase (G6PD)
a regulatory enzyme in the metabolism of glucose-6-phosphate. A deficiency of the enzyme in the erythrocyte results in a hemolytic anemia; an inherited abnormality in humans, rats and mice and acquired in animals in phenothiazine toxicity and ingestion of kale.
glucose phosphate isomerase
converts glucose-6-phosphate to fructose-6-phosphate and the reverse reaction.
glucose suppression test
suppression of blood levels of growth hormone by the intravenous administration of glucose is used to diagnose acromegaly.
glucose tolerance factor (GTF)
a naturally occurring substance containing chromium which potentiates the effects of insulin.
glucose tolerance test
a test of the body's ability to utilize carbohydrates. It is often used to detect abnormalities of carbohydrate metabolism such as occur in diabetes mellitus, hypoglycemia, and liver and adrenocortical dysfunction. If administered orally, it may also be used to assess the absorptive capacity of the small intestine.
References in periodicals archive ?
Put the granulated sugar and liquid glucose into a saucepan with 200ml water and, over a low heat, stir until all the sugar has dissolved.
The 'Delia Effect' iswell-documented - her culinary tips havemade the fortunes of a pan-maker, caused a run on cranberries, and wiped out the European supply of liquid glucose.
Over the years, the Delia factor has also boosted sales of lime and coriander, liquid glucose, tahini paste, cranberry and even lemon zesters.
For the pears: 4 small dessert pears 500g unrefined golden caster sugar 450ml water The juice and zest of a lemon For the chocolate soup-souffle base: 400ml double cream 100g bitter chocolate A pinch of Maldon salt For the hazelnut crisps: 100g liquid glucose 480g caster sugar 500g chopped hazelnuts 500g white bread, finely diced 200g cornflour 320g icing sugar 160g butter, melted Pinch of Maldon salt 4 fresh, free-range eggs, beaten To serve: 1 fresh, free-range egg white person A pinch unrefined golden caster sugar Method: First, make the soup-souffle base.
Where other people could eat something such as a biscuit or liquid glucose to raise their blood sugar level, Sarah would have no warning and go into hypo.
CHOCOLATE MOUSSE (This recipe contains raw egg) Serves four Ingredients 1 leaf gelatine soaked and squeezed one and three quarter fl oz water 1 tablespoon liquid glucose 125g (5oz) plain chocolate broken into pieces 1 egg yolk 300ml (half a pint) double cream Method Boil the water and glucose together.
Stephen Jackson's Homemade Nougat Bars For the nougat: 450g unrefined golden caster sugar 100g liquid glucose 100ml water 50g bitter chocolate 50g Horlicks powder 2 large free-range egg whites ' tsp Maldon salt For the coating: 800-900g milk or plain chocolate Extras: Sugar thermometer Baking parchment A suitable tray for setting (ideally about 9" square) A fondue skewer or long fork Method: First, we need to make the nougat filling.
Stephen Jackson'sWagon Wheels For the biscuits: 360g butter at room temperature 300g unrefined golden caster sugar 110g unrefined light muscovado sugar 4 eggs 4 tsp vanilla extract 700g plain flour 2 tsp baking powder Large pinch Maldon salt For the marshmallow: 9 sheets leaf gelatine 450g caster sugar 1 tbsp liquid glucose 200ml water 2 large egg whites 1 tsp vanilla extract To assemble: A jar of raspberry jam 800-900g milk chocolate Extras: Sugar thermometer Piping bag Pastry cutters Baking parchment & clingfilm Method: First, we need to make the biscuits.