liquescent


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liquescent

 [lĭ-kwes´ent]
tending to become liquid or fluid.

li·ques·cent

(li-kwes'ĕnt)
Becoming or tending to become liquid.
[L. liquesco, to become liquid]

liquescent

(li-kwe′sĕnt) [L. liquescere, to become liquid]
Being or becoming liquid.
References in periodicals archive ?
The Beauvais setting merely has doubled notes, but some of the comparable three-part congeners (and once in Beauvais) have the second of the doubled notes as a liquescent.
A further complication (leaving aside whether the occasional epiphonus is to be read as an atrophied liquescent) is that single liquescents (that is, the note-form representing a single note only, but still calling attention to a semivocalis pronunciation) are often, or even largely, indistinguishable from the cephalicus.
FEDD) and other instances (GAGG) is clearly a single-note liquescent, irrespective of phonological considerations.
Machaut's Mass is one of the last French works to use the plica, an ornamental figure derived from the liquescent neume.
It has a typical crux relating to the liquescent forms alluded to earlier and whose understanding is an essential prerequisite for a new transcription of the work (and of whose details I failed to take proper account in the 1976 Plainsong and Medieval Music Society edition).
The symbol should have been a single-note liquescent.
Although this is doubtless a stray misread single-note liquescent, some earlier exemplar must itself have had a cephalicus, for the ultimate model (as in the Winchester Troper) has the two notes, so here we have a species of double bluff.
A pattern of red and yellow flowers floats across her liquescent flesh as across the surface of a pond.