lipreading


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lipreading

A means of communication with the deaf. English speech involves more than forty distinct sounds but less than ten visibly distinguishable mouth patterns can be reliably identified. Other facial, bodily and contextual clues are, however, provided and a skilled lipreader can often discern or infer 60% of spoken information.
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"We are based in Loughborough and have now run for nine years a successful, oversubscribed, lipreading class in Loughborough after a larger charity withdrew classes from Leicestershire.
The results suggest that lipreading success depends on a person's ability to "hear" the words formed by moving lips, Saalasti said.
Lipreading classes, which are not available on the NHS, are usually funded through the Community Learning budget.
Mr McCabe said: "I saw first-hand how important lipreading is to people with a hearing loss.
Hearing by eye: The psychology of lipreading. Hillsdale (NJ): Lawrence Erlbaum Associates; 1987.
Around 500,000 people in Wales are deaf or hard of hearing but there are currently very few qualified lipreading tutors.
He wears discreet digital hearing aids but prefers to take them out while he's acting, relying on lipreading to know when to say his lines.
(1996) Lipreading, reading and memory of hearing and hearing-impaired children.
A selection of equipment to help people in their homes; Vicky and Ron enjoy a meat out with the Holyhead Lipreading Group; Angela and Alistair at an information event delivered in their preferred language - British Sign Language; Kyle checks out the equipment with Technical Officer, Jackie Claydon
An unstoppable force of nature, her adventures lipreading the bad guys' conversations for the FBI were grist for a cable TV series called "Sue Thomas: F.B.Eye" a few years ago.
However, speechreading performance was 97% correct when augmented with audible speech as tested at the word level with The Craig Lipreading Inventory (Craig, 1964/1990).