lipoid pneumonia


Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus, Encyclopedia.

lip·id pneu·mo·ni·a

, lipoid pneumonia
pulmonary condition marked by inflammatory and fibrotic changes in the lungs due to the inhalation of various oily or fatty substances, particularly liquid petrolatum, or resulting from accumulation in the lungs of endogenous lipid material, either cholesterol from obstructive pneumonitis or following fracture of a bone; phagocytes containing lipid are usually present.
Synonym(s): oil pneumonia

lipoid pneumonia

Golden pneumonia A pneumonitis caused by exogenous oils that percolate into the lung after intranasal instillation of mineral oil, oral ingestion of cod liver, castor or other oils, or due to a congenital defect in oropharyngeal diaphragm–eg, cleft palate or intense gag reflex. See Mineral oil. Cf Aspiration pneumonia.

lip·id pneu·mo·ni·a

, lipoid pneumonia (lip'id nū-mō'nē-ă, lip'oyd)
Pulmonary condition marked by inflammatory and fibrotic changes in the lungs due to the inhalation of various oily or fatty substances, particularly liquid petrolatum, or resulting from accumulation in the lungs of endogenous lipid material, either cholesterol from obstructive pneumonitis or following fracture of a bone; phagocytes containing lipid are usually present.

lipoid pneumonia

see lipid pneumonia.
References in periodicals archive ?
Hui, "Endogenous lipoid pneumonia associated with legionella pneumophila serogroup 1," Singapore Medical Journal, vol.
Gorospe Sarasua, "Exogenous lipoid pneumonia in laryngectomy patients: radiological findings," Archivos de Bronconeumologia, vol.
Oliveira, "Exogenous lipoid pneumonia (Fire-eater's Lung)," American Journal of Medicine, vol.
An acute form of lipoid pneumonia or fire eater's lung," Thorax, vol.
Guleria, "'diesel siphoner's lung': exogenous lipoid pneumonia following hydrocarbon aspiration," Lung India, vol.
Clinic and radiological improvement of lipoid pneumonia with multiple bronchoalveolar lavages," Pediatric Pulmonology, vol.
Pulmonary infections with rapidly growing mycobacteria in the setting of swallowing disorders and/or lipoid pneumonia are most commonly due to Mycobacterium fortuitum.
Infection of the lungs by `saprophytic' mycobacteria in achalasia of the cardia, with report of a fatal case showing lipoid pneumonia due to milk.
2] When present in lipoid pneumonias, the organisms may be found within clear vacuoles corresponding to lipid droplets.