lipofuscin


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lipofuscin

 [lip″o-fu´sin]
1. a yellow to brown, granular, iron-negative lipid pigment found particularly in muscle, heart, liver, and nerve cells; it is the product of cellular wear and tear, accumulating in lysosomes with age.

lip·o·fus·cin

(lip'ō-fyūs'in),
Brown pigment granules representing lipid-containing residues of lysosomal digestion and considered one of the aging or "wear and tear" pigments; found in liver, kidney, heart muscle, adrenal, and ganglion cells.

lipofuscin

(lĭp′ō-fŭs′ĭn, -fyo͞o′sĭn)
n.
A lipid-containing brownish-yellow pigment that occurs in granules especially in senescent cells.

lipofuscin

A pigmented lipid degradation product thought to derive from peroxidative destruction of mitochondrial polyunsaturated lipid membrane or the mitochondrion itself; the malonaldehyde produced by mitochondrial peroxide damage may block DNA template, activity contributing to heart failure; lipofuscin accumulates with age in the heart, muscle, liver, nerve, and in lysosomes

lip·o·fus·cin

(lip'ō-fyūs'in)
Brown pigment granules representing lipid-containing residues of lysosomal digestion and considered one of the aging or "wear-and-tear" pigments; found in liver, kidney, heart muscle, and ganglion cells.

lipofuscin

A golden-brown pigment that occurs in granules in muscle and nerve cells in numbers proportional to the age of the individual. Also known as age pigment.

lipofuscin

Yellowish-brown pigment granules formed as a result of oxidation of protein and lipid residues, and found in various tissues (e.g. liver, kidney, heart muscle, adrenals, nerve cells). It normally accumulates with age within the lysosomes of cells and its accumulation in the retinal pigment epithelium (RPE) is a major risk factor of age-related macular degeneration as it may damage RPE cells and lead to the formation of drusen and RPE atrophy. In albinos the pigment granules are immature and colourless.
References in periodicals archive ?
More accurate chronological age determination of crustaceans from field situations using the physiological age marker, lipofuscin. Mar.
Abnormal Cytoplasm Includes: (a) fiber with pale acidophilic peripheral cyto- plasm and enlarged peripheral nuclei with or without visible nucleoli, or (b) fiber with pale acidophilic peripheral cytoplasm and deep acidophilic fuzzy cytoplasm in the central region, or (c) lipofuscin, or (d) split or whorled fibers, or (e) vacuoles, or (f) uneven cytoplasmic staining unrelated to processing, or (g) fiber with dull or light grey staining, or (h) cytoplasmic fragmentation.
Further, lipofuscin (LF) index in small crabs (<40 mm CW) cannot be determined because of analytical limitations (Ju et al., 1999).
`I hope to see a build up of lipofuscin in the nerve cells as I progress through the time series of krill,' McGaffin says.
Lipofuscin redistribution and loss accompanied by cytoskeletal stress in retinal pigment epithelium of eyes with age-related macular degeneration.
Sparrow, "Novel lipofuscin bisretinoids prominent in human retina and in a model of recessive Stargardt disease," The Journal of Biological Chemistry, vol.
Originally described by Hermansky and Pudlak in 1959, (77) Hermansky-Pudlak Syndrome (HPS) is caused by a related group of autosomal recessive disorders that are characterized by the triad of oculocutaneous albinism, bleeding diathesis due to a platelet storage pool deficiency, and lysosomal accumulation of ceroid lipofuscin. (78) Currently, 9 distinct molecular subtypes of HPS are recognized (79); the most common form of HPS (type 1) is caused by a 16-bp duplication within the HPS1 gene on chromosome 10.
Oxidative stress and presumably other factors lead to accumulation of heterogenous lysosomal lipofuscin in retinal pigment epithelium (RPE), which induces a proinflammatory response.
(37) These aggregates of damaged and cross-linked proteins, known as lipofuscin, are detrimental to normal cell functions.
There was mild anisokaryosis, and perinuclear vacuoles containing lipofuscin granules were widespread.
Significantly higher fractions of lipofuscin, an insoluble lipid peroxidation byproduct that can be related to contaminant exposure, in kidney diverticula of the coal-exposed mussels suggested that unidentified contaminants were present in the water.