lipochrome


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lipochrome

 [lip″o-krōm]
any of a group of fat-soluble hydrocarbon pigments, such as carotene, lutein, and the natural yellow coloring material of butter, egg yolk, and yellow corn. Called also carotenoid.

lip·o·chrome

(lip'ō-krōm),
1. A pigmented lipid, for example, lutein, carotene. Synonym(s): chromolipid
2. A term sometimes used to designate the wear-and-tear pigments, for example, lipofuscin, hemofuscin, ceroid. More precisely, lipochromes are yellow pigments that seem to be identical to carotene and xanthophyll and are frequently found in the serum, skin, adrenal cortex, corpus luteum, and arteriosclerotic plaques, as well as in the liver, spleen, and adipose tissue; lipochromes do not stain with the ordinary dyes for fat.
3. The pigment produced by certain bacteria.
[lipo- + G. chroma, color]

lipochrome

/lipo·chrome/ (lip´o-krōm) any of a group of fat-soluble hydrocarbon pigments, such as carotene, xanthophyll, lutein, chromophane, and the natural coloring material of butter, egg yolk, and yellow corn.

lipochrome

[lip′əkrōm]
Etymology: Gk, lipos + chroma, color
any of the naturally occurring pigments that contain a lipid and give a yellow color to fats, such as carotene.

lipochrome

A nonspecific term for any natural, fat-soluble pigment—e.g., lipofuscin, carotenes and lycopenes.

lipochrome

Any natural, fat-soluble pigment–eg, lipofuscin, carotenes, lycopenes

lip·o·chrome

(lip'ō-krōm)
1. A pigmented lipid, e.g., lutein, carotene.
2. More specifically, yellow pigments that seem identical to carotene and xanthophyll and are frequently found in the serum, skin, cortex of suprarenal gland, corpus luteum, and arteriosclerotic plaques, as well as in the liver, spleen, and adipose tissue.
3. The pigment produced by certain bacteria.
[lipo- + G. chroma, color]

lipochrome

any one of a group of fat-soluble hydrocarbon pigments, such as carotene, lutein, chromophane, and the natural yellow coloring material of butter, egg yolk, and yellow corn. They are also known as carotenoids.
References in periodicals archive ?
They are interpreting the intracytoplasmic inclusions reported previously[2] as type 2B lipochrome pigment granules (LPGs).
However, through a complex series of HPLC studies of the red feathers in 44 species of parrots (of more than 350 total species, 80% of which have red plumage), McGraw and co-researcher Mary Nogare found a unique set of five molecules responsible for the red coloring in the feathers, called polyneal lipochromes, or psittacofulvins.
They found that all the birds' red feathers contained a set of five pigments called polyenal lipochromes.