lipoblastomatosis

lip·o·blas·to·ma·to·sis

(lip'ō-blas'tō-mă-tō'sis),
A diffuse form of lipoblastoma that infiltrates locally but does not metastasize.

lip·o·blas·to·ma·to·sis

(lip'ō-blas-tō'mă-tō'sis)
A diffuse form of lipoblastoma that infiltrates locally but does not metastasize.
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References in periodicals archive ?
Previously reported liposarcoma cases in infancy are mostly deemed as lipoblastomatosis now.[sup][2],[3] Normally, liposarcoma rarely occurs in head and neck and unlikely causes obvious manifestations at early stage.
a lesion resembling hibernoma, lipoblastomatosis and infiltrating lipoma," Archives of Pathology, vol.
It has been suggested that fibrolipoma arise from the maturation of the lipoblastomatosis which is an infiltrative type of benign neoplasm with lobules of immature fat cells separated by connective tissue septa and areas of loose myxoid matrix.
(5) Histologically the well-circumscribed and encapsulated features of lipoblastoma differentiate it from the multicentric and infiltrative nature of lipoblastomatosis. (5) This tumour has a wide anatomical distribution but chiefly affects the extremities.
(1) The tumor presents in 2 forms: a localized well-circumscribed lesion (lipoblastoma) and an unencapsulated diffuse type (lipoblastomatosis).
Lipoblastoma and lipoblastomatosis: A clinicopathological study of 14 cases.
(1) In 1973, Chung and Enzinger suggested the terms benign lipoblastoma to describe the circumscribed type of tumor and benign lipoblastomatosis to describe the condition in which multiple tumors are locally diffused.
This variety of lipoblastoma has been termed lipoblastomatosis. (3) Lipoblastomas typically arise from the limbs or trunk.
Both lipoblastoma and lipoblastomatosis have a benign course, though they both have a tendency to recur in spite of complete excision.
Lipoblastomatosis is a rare, fat-containing, benign tumor that should be considered as a differential diagnosis of recurrent soft tissue neck masses in infants and children.