lipid

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lipid

 [lip´id]
a group of substances comprising fatty, greasy, oily, and waxy compounds that are insoluble in water and soluble in nonpolar solvents, such as hexane, ether, and chloroform.

Simple lipids are the triglycerides or neutral fats. Each triglyceride molecule is composed of one molecule of glycerol joined by ester linkages to three fatty acid molecules. They are an important source of fuel to the body and a much lighter form of energy storage than carbohydrate.

Compound lipids are important structural components of cell membranes. Phospholipids include lecithin and the cephalins, which are composed of fatty acids linked to phosphatidic acid, and the sphingomyelins, which are composed of fatty acids linked to sphingosine. Glycolipids are composed of a carbohydrate chain and fatty acids linked to sphingosine or ceramide. Cholesterol is a steroid alcohol. Another important function of the phospholipids is as lung surfactants.

Intravenous lipid emulsions can be administered to patients with a deficiency of essential fatty acids.

lip·id

(lip'id),
"Fat-soluble," an operational term describing a solubility characteristic, not a chemical substance, that is, denoting substances extracted from animal or vegetable cells by nonpolar solvents; included in the heterogeneous collection of materials thus extractable are fatty acids, glycerides and glyceryl ethers, phospholipids, sphingolipids, long-chain alcohols and waxes, terpenes, steroids, and "fat-soluble" vitamins such as A, D, and E.
[G. lipos, fat]

lipid

/lip·id/ (lip´id) any of a heterogeneous group of fats and fatlike substances, including fatty acids, neutral fats, waxes, and steroids, which are water-insoluble and soluble in nonpolar solvents. Lipids, which are easily stored in the body, serve as a source of fuel, are an important constituent of cell structure, and serve other biological functions. Compound lipids comprise the glycolipids, lipoproteins, and phospholipids.

lipid

(lĭp′ĭd, lī′pĭd) also

lipide

(lĭp′īd′, lī′pīd′)
n.
Any of a group of organic compounds, including the fats, oils, waxes, sterols, and triglycerides, that are insoluble in water but soluble in nonpolar organic solvents, are oily to the touch, and together with carbohydrates and proteins constitute the principal structural material of living cells.

lip·id′ic adj.

lipid

[lip′id, lī′pid]
Etymology: Gk, lipos, fat, eidos, form
any of a structurally diverse group of organic compounds that are insoluble in water but soluble in alcohol, chloroform, ether, and other solvents. Some lipids are stored in the body and serve as an energy reserve but are elevated in various diseases such as atherosclerosis. Kinds of lipids include cholesterol, fatty acids, phospholipids, and triglycerides. The normal concentrations of lipids in serum are total, 400 to 800 mg/dl; cholesterol, 150 to 250 mg/dl; fatty acids, 9 to 15 mM/L; phospholipids, 150 to 380 mg/dl; phospholipid as phosphorus, 9 to 16 mg/dl; and triglycerides, 10 to 190 mg/dl.

LIPID

Cardiology A clinical trial–Long-Term Intervention with Pravastatin in Ischemic Disease–which evaluated preventing cardiovascular M&M with pravastatin in Pts with CAD and a range of initial cholesterol levels

lip·id

(lip'id)
"Fat-soluble," an operational term describing a solubility characteristic, not a chemical substance, i.e., denoting substances extracted from animal or vegetable cells by nonpolar solvents; included in the heterogeneous collection of materials thus extractable are fatty acids, glycerides, glyceryl ethers, phospholipids, sphingolipids, long-chain alcohols, waxes, terpenes, steroids, and "fat-soluble" vitamins such as A, D, and E.

lipid

a biological compound composed of glycerol and fatty acid components, containing carbon, hydrogen and oxygen together with other elements such as nitrogen and phosphorus. Lipids (or fats) are structural components of cell membranes and nervous tissue, and are important sources of energy, being stored in various parts of the body (see ADIPOSE TISSUE). They are important insulators and mechanical protectors. Their large molecular size makes lipids insoluble in water, but soluble in organic solvents such as acetone and ether. There are five lipid groups:

triglycerides (fats and oils)

phospholipids

glycolipids

sterols and steroids

waxes

Lipid

A greasy organic compound that cannot be dissolved in water. Triglycerides, which are broken down by lipase, are one type of blood lipid.

lipid,

n fat or a similar greasy substance that dissolves in alcohol and organic solvents but not in water.

lip·id

(lip'id)
"Fat-soluble," operational term describing a solubility characteristic, not a chemical substance, i.e., denoting substances extracted from animal or vegetable cells by nonpolar solvents.

lipid (lip´id),

n a heterogeneous group of substances related actually or potentially to the fatty acids that are soluble in nonpolar solvents such as benzene, chloroform, and ether and are relatively insoluble in water. Included are the fatty acids, acylglycerols, phospholipids, cerebrosides, and steroids.
lipid, plasma,
n the various plasma lipid classes include triacylglycerols, phospholipids, cholesterol, cholesterol esters, and unesterified fatty acids. Because of their hydrophobic nature, plasma lipids are carried in association with specific plasma proteins, the lipoproteins.

lipid

a group of substances comprising fatty, greasy, oily and waxy compounds that are insoluble in water and soluble in nonpolar solvents, such as hexane, ether and chloroform.
Simple lipids are the triglycerides or neutral fats. Each triglyceride molecule is composed of one molecule of glycerol joined by ester linkages to three fatty acid molecules. They are an important source of oxidizable substrate to the body and have a greater caloric density (2.25 times) than carbohydrate.
Compound lipids are important structural components of cell membranes. Phospholipids include lecithin and the cephalins, which are composed of fatty acids linked to phosphatidic acid, and the sphingomyelins, which are composed of fatty acids linked to sphingosine. Glycolipids are composed of a carbohydrate chain and fatty acids linked to sphingosine or ceramide. Cholesterol is a steroid alcohol. Another important function of the phospholipids is as lung surfactants.

lipid A
a component of the cell wall of gram-negative bacteria, responsible for their toxic properties.
lipid pneumonia
see lipid pneumonia.
protected l's
fats treated to protect them against microbial degeneration in the rumen.
lipid transport disease
a group of diseases in which there is a disorder of lipid metabolism with abnormal levels or types of lipoproteins in the blood, e.g. hyperlipoproteinemia, hyperlipemia.
References in periodicals archive ?
1998) reviewed the biogenesis and function of four lipidic structures associated with male gametophytes; exine and pollenkitt as extracellular lipidic structures, and storage oil bodies and a dense membrane network as intracellular lipidic structures.
Visualization of the rubbing surfaces revealed that the lipidic surfaces remain almost intact.
These lipidic reserves ensure that embryonic and larval development concludes successfully in diverse species of bivalves (Holland 1978, Gallager et al.
A deeper knowledge of what we use to drink should in our wishes induce a better respect for the "game's rules", and this shall surely develop in a higher and higher chance to succeed in enjoying the good result of a blend of factors, joined during the years in a nearly casual, I would say artistic, way: * aroma's solubility in the lipidic phase * oils emulsifying by means of pressure * volatilizing in the cup of the oil dissolved aromas,
The approach taken here is a general one, where the principles and techniques presented can be applied to any lipidic material.
Organic Markers in Lipidic Fraction of Sewage Sludges, Water Research, 39: 1215-1232.
Along with disruption of the synthesis of proteins and the vitamin balance, in particular, the sharp insufficiency of vitamins A, E, B1, and B2, there were observed shifts in a lipidic exchange that was expressed as a noticeable reduction of the monounsaturated and polyunsaturated fatty acids level.
Isabelle Imbert, Ashland Specialty Ingredients, explained why lipidic homeostasis is essential to maintain skin barrier structure and function through aging and environmental insult.
monoterpenes and sesquiterpenes) can readily penetrate the lipidic bilayer, whose hydrophobic interior is a perfect matrix for lipophilic molecules.
Effect of a lipidic extract from lepidium meyenii on sexual behavior in mice and rats.
Hepatic microsomal membrane lipidic composition and growth hormone effect in adult male rat: evidence for a 'feminization' process of total phospholipid fatty acid pattern.