lipidation

lipidation

See Protein lipidation.
References in periodicals archive ?
To confirm the conversion of LC3-I to LC3II through lipidation, which allows LC3 translocation to form autophagic vesicle membranes, LC3B was directly detected using immunoblotting and LC3B-II formation was increased by compound 1 (Fig.
Some important questions on autophagosome biogenesis remain to be elusive, such as where the bona fide marker protein of autophagosome, LC3, is lipidated, how lipidated LC3 functions in autophagosome formation, and how the proteins for LC3 lipidation and delipidation are involved in autophagosome formation.
The first step is lipidation catalyzed by farnesyl transferase and geranylgeranyl (the enzyme determines the last amino acid in the sequence CAAX) [8].
It is processed to LC3-II through posttranslational modification and lipidation by ubiquitination-like reactions mediated by Atg7 and Atg3, which are bound to both the outer and inner membranes of the autophagosome.
Microsomal triglyceride transfer protein lipidation and control of CD1d on antigen-presenting cells," The Journal of Experimental Medicine, vol.
Yoshimori, "The Atg16L complex specifies the site of LC3 lipidation for membrane biogenesis in autophagy," Molecular Biology of the Cell, vol.
Posttranslational modifications like glycosylation, acetylation, and lipidation occur frequently and further increase the complexity of the proteome (26).
coli is generally not suitable for the expression of proteins that contain a high level of disulfide connectivity or proteins that require post-translational modifications such as glycosylation proline cis/trans isomerization disulfide isomerization lipidation sulfation or phosphorylation (Daly and Hearn 2005; Macauley-Patrick et al.
For instance, genes within region B were thought to encode lipidation enzymes and, thus, have been known as lipA and lipB.
Our team of experts designs the most efficient processes for peptidic active pharmaceutical ingredients using innovative technologies such as PEGylation, lipidation, glycosylation, ligation, cyclization (multiple disulfide or lactam bridges).
Although HDL can acquire cholesterol from any cell, including arterial-wall foam cells, the majority of HDL lipidation occurs in the liver or proximal small intestine, after which it is trafficked to steroidogenic tissue, adipocytes, or back to the liver.
The implication of this is that lipidation of apolipoprotein A-I by the ABCA1 pathway is necessary for the generation of HDL particles and the clearing of sterol from macrophages.