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Related to lip-read: lip reader, Speechreading

lip

 [lip]
1. the upper or lower fleshy margin of the mouth.
2. any liplike part; called also labium.
double lip redundancy of the submucous tissue and mucous membrane of the lip on either side of the median line.
glenoid lip a ring of fibrocartilage joined to the rim of the glenoid cavity.
Hapsburg lip a thick, overdeveloped lower lip that often accompanies Hapsburg jaw.
Miller-Keane Encyclopedia and Dictionary of Medicine, Nursing, and Allied Health, Seventh Edition. © 2003 by Saunders, an imprint of Elsevier, Inc. All rights reserved.

LIP

Acronym for lymphocytic interstitial pneumonia or lymphoid interstitial pneumonia. See: lymphocytic interstitial pneumonia.

lip

(lip), [TA]
1. One of the two muscular folds with an outer membrane having a stratified squamous cell epithelial surface layer that bound the mouth anteriorly.
See also: labium, labrum.
2. Any liplike structure bounding a cavity or groove.
See also: labium, labrum.
Synonym(s): labium (1) [TA]
[A.S. lippa]
Farlex Partner Medical Dictionary © Farlex 2012

lip

(lĭp)
n.
1. Anatomy
a. Either of two fleshy structures that surround the opening of the mouth in humans and other mammals.
b. In humans, the smooth brownish to reddish border of the lip.
2. A structure or part that encircles or bounds an orifice, as:
a. Anatomy A labium.
b. The margin of flesh around a wound.
c. Either of the margins of the aperture of a gastropod shell.
d. A rim, as of a vessel, bell, or crater.

lip′less adj.
The American Heritage® Medical Dictionary Copyright © 2007, 2004 by Houghton Mifflin Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Company. All rights reserved.

lip

(lip) [TA]
1. One of the two muscular folds that encircle the mouth anteriorly; each has an outer mucosa with a stratified squamous epithelial surface layer.
2. Any liplike structure bounding a cavity or groove.
Synonym(s): labium (1) [TA] .
[A.S. lippa]
Medical Dictionary for the Health Professions and Nursing © Farlex 2012

lip

  1. (of an embryonic BLASTOPORE) the rim of the blastopore.
  2. (of a flower perianth) a group of perianth segments united to a greater or lesser extent, to form a distinct grouping thus divided from the rest of the perianth.
  3. (of vertebrates) one of two fleshy parts (upper and lower) surrounding the mouth.
Collins Dictionary of Biology, 3rd ed. © W. G. Hale, V. A. Saunders, J. P. Margham 2005

lip

(lip) [TA]
1. One of two muscular folds with outer membrane having a stratified squamous cell epithelial surface layer around mouth.
2. Any liplike structure bounding a cavity or groove.
[A.S. lippa]
Medical Dictionary for the Dental Professions © Farlex 2012
References in periodicals archive ?
From police surveillance video, Elinor lip-read them chatting about how they had plotted to murder Bowen's husband, who was found with his throat slit and skull smashed in an alley in Stoke-on-Trent.
"We have had calls from one or two individuals saying they can lip-read and we have asked them to formally write to us.
We'd all end up with cushions covering our ears trying to lip-read the characters on screen.
TO MARK National Deaf Awareness Week (May 5-11), Warwickshire College is running a free taster session for all hard-of-hearing people who are interested in learning to lip-read.
If she could lip-read I think she would have understood!"
Former England rugby champ Ben Cohen, who is strutting his stuff on Strictly, suffers from tinnitus and has to lip-read with dance partner Kristina Rihanoff.
Unlike the traditional approach to lip-reading training, where viewers are taught to spot key lip-shapes from static (often drawn) images, the new video-based training system significantly improved their ability to lip-read monosyllabic words.
I NORMALLY find it easier to lip-read Chinese than follow what Roisin Henderson's saying in River City.
"My team leader could lip-read and she once caught me slagging her off.
"I'd sit at the front of the class, but even then it was really difficult because I couldn't write or follow a textbook and lip-read what the teachers were saying at the same time," she explains.