lion


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lion

the largest wild carnivore, yellow, tawny or gray in color; males have a distinctive mane. Called also Panthera leo.

lion jaw
see craniomandibular osteopathy.
mountain lion
a lion-colored, maneless lion. Called also Panthera concolor (syn. Felis concolor), cougar, puma.
lion-tailed macaque
Macaca silenus. See also macaque.
References in classic literature ?
cried Umslopogaas, and by nature, as it were, we did the boy's bidding; for huddling ourselves together, we held out the assegais so that the lion fell upon them as he sprang, and their blades sank far into him.
Help's pretty hard to get these days," said the lion.
So far did his unparalleled madness go; but the noble lion, more courteous than arrogant, not troubling himself about silly bravado, after having looked all round, as has been said, turned about and presented his hind-quarters to Don Quixote, and very coolly and tranquilly lay down again in the cage.
Closer and closer to the dread destroyer he came, until, with a sudden, angry growl, the lion rose from his bed not ten paces from the youth.
I didn't bite him," said the Lion, as he rubbed his nose with his paw where Dorothy had hit it.
The horse did as he was told, and the fox went straight to the lion who lived in a cave close by, and said to him, 'A little way off lies a dead horse; come with me and you may make an excellent meal of his carcase.
Aunt Em turned upon the Lion a determined countenance and a wild dilated eye.
One after another as rapidly as he could gather and hurl them, Tarzan pelted the hard fruit down upon the lion.
Immediately he was rewarded by the sound of a movement within the cave and an instant later a wild-eyed, haggard lion rushed forth ready to face the devil himself were he edible.
Half a dozen times the lion paced up and down, declining to take any notice of the intruder.
It seemed impossible to believe that in this peaceful woodland setting the frightful thing was to occur which must come with the passing of the next lion who chanced within sight or smell of the crumbling arch.
Numa, the lion, was hungry, he was very hungry, and so he was quite silent now.