linolenic acid


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Related to linolenic acid: Alpha linolenic acid

linolenic acid

 [lin″o-len´ik]
an essential fatty acid that cannot be synthesized by animal tissues and must be obtained in the diet.

lin·o·len·ic ac·id

(lin'ō-len'ik as'id), Do not confuse this word with linoleic acid.
9,12,15-octadecatrienoic acid (also referred to as α-l); an 18-carbon triply unsaturated fatty acid that is essential in the nutrition of mammals. γ-linolenic acid is 6,9,12-octadecatrienoic acid.

linolenic acid

/lin·o·len·ic ac·id/ (lin″o-len´ik) a polyunsaturated 18-carbon essential fatty acid occurring in some fish oils and many seed-derived oils.

linolenic acid

(lĭn′ə-lĕn′ĭk)
n.
An unsaturated fatty acid, C18H30O2, considered essential to the human diet. It is an important component of natural drying oils.

linolenic acid

[lin′ōlen′ik]
Etymology: Gk, linon, flax, oleum, oil
an unsaturated essential fatty acid occurring in triglycerides of canola, soy, linseed, and other vegetable oils.

linolenic acid

An essential 18-carbon fatty acid with 3 unsaturated bonds of either plant (alpha-linolenic acid) or animal (gamma-linolenic acid) origin.

lin·o·len·ic ac·id

(lin'ō-len'ik as'id) Do not confuse this word with linoleic acid.
An 18-carbon triply unsaturated fatty acid that is essential in the nutrition of mammals.

linolenic acid

An essential fatty acid. Like LINOLEIC and arachidonic acids it is polyunsaturated and found in vegetable oils and wheat germ.

linolenic acid

an essential fatty acid; α-linolenic acid is an 18 carbon fatty acid containing three double bonds at carbons 9, 12, and 15; found in plant leaves and some vegetable oils. γ-linolenic acid is an 18 carbon fatty acid containing double bonds at carbons 6, 9 and 12; produced in animals by the desaturation of linoleic acid.
References in periodicals archive ?
I'm concerned about powdered formulas without linolenic acid," says Susan Carlson, of the University of Tennessee in Memphis.
In soybean oil oleic (C18:1), linoleic acid (C18:2) and linolenic acid (C18:3) percentage were 23.
The relationship of total plasma PUFAs, n-3 FA, linolenic acid, n-6 FA, linoleic acid, arachidonic acid, and creatinine at enrollment with change in creatinine from baseline to follow-up was examined using multivariate linear regression models adjusted for covariates, including age, sex, BMI, education, cigarette smoking (pack-years), MMSE score, energy intake, alcohol intake, LDL cholesterol, HDL cholesterol, cancer, cardiovascular disease, and hypertension (Table 3).
To cut trans fats in their products by 2006, the food industry could switch from soybean oil to alternative oils that don't contain linolenic acid.
Soybean oil with a high linolenic acid content requires hydrogenation, which causes an increase in trans-fatty acids.
One solution is to take linolenic acid in the form of EPO, usually in glycerine capsules.
Ideal traits identified by the food industry include higher oleic acid content and less linolenic acid and saturated fat.
Developed for the southern United States, Soyola yields oil with about half the linolenic acid of today's commercial varieties.
The study published in the latest issue of the American Journal of Clinical Nutrition, found that salad dressings and mayonnaise contain alpha linolenic acid, an omega-3 fatty acid, that has protective effects against heart disease.
Eleven articles (13,323 breast cancer events and 687,770 participants) investigated fish intake, 17 articles investigated marine n-3 PUFA (16,178 breast cancer events and 527,392 participants) and 12 articles investigated alpha linolenic acid (14,284 breast cancer events and 405,592 participants).
The capsules include gamma linolenic acid, oleic acid and linoleic acid, combined with vitamin E.