linoleic acid


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Related to linoleic acid: linolenic acid, Conjugated linoleic acid

linoleic acid

 [lin″o-le´ik]
an essential fatty acid that cannot be synthesized by animal tissues and must be obtained in the diet.

lin·o·le·ic ac·id

(lin'ō-lē'ik as'id), Do not confuse this word with linolenic acid.
9,12-Octadecadienoic acid; a doubly unsaturated 18-carbon fatty acid, occurring widely in plant glycerides, that is essential in nutrition in mammals.
Synonym(s): linolic acid
[L. linum, flax, + oleum, oil]

linoleic acid

(lĭn′ə-lē′ĭk)
n.
An unsaturated fatty acid, C18H32O2, that is considered essential to the human diet. It is an important component of drying oils, such as linseed oil.

linoleic acid

An essential 18-carbon fatty acid with two unsaturated bonds which derived from plant oils.

lin·o·le·ic ac·id

(lin'ō-lē'ik as'id) Do not confuse this word with linolenic acid.
Doubly unsaturated 18-carbon fatty acid, occurring widely in plant glycerides; essential in nutrition in mammals.
[L. linum, flax, + oleum, oil]

linoleic acid

The principle fatty acid in plant seed oils. An essential polyunsaturated fatty acid, interconvertible with LINOLENIC ACID and arachidonic acid and needed for cell membranes and the synthesis of PROSTAGLANDINS. It is plentiful in vegetable fats. Essential fatty acid dietary deficiency is rare.

linoleic acid

or

essential fatty acid

an unsaturated fatty acid that cannot be synthesized in the human body and is therefore described as ‘essential’. Deficiency of linoleic acid in the diet results in increased metabolic activity, failure in growth and even death.
References in periodicals archive ?
Four different diet formulas were provided to the groups of mice: a Standard Chow as plain control (P group), a chow supplemented with linoleic acid 9 mg/mouse/day, linoleic control (C group), oxidized linoleic acid, 9 mg/mouse/day (A group), and oxidized linoleic acid 18 mg/mouse/day diet (B group).
It is reported that dietary safflower oil, which is rich in the linoleic acid, reduced trunk adipose mass and increased total body lean mass in obese women with type 2 diabetes and was associated with gene expression of uncoupling protein (UCP) 1 and UCP content in the adipose tissue of rats [18,19].
Belury says the study does not explain the apparent interplay between linoleic acid and measures of risk for heart disease and diabetes.
Inhibition of benzo(a) pyrene-induced mouse forestomach neoplasia by conjugated dienoic derivatives of linoleic acid. Cancer Res., 50: 1097-1101.
Conjugated linoleic acid attenuates the production and gene expression of proinflammatory cytokines in weaned pigs challenged with lipopolysaccharide.
Later we'll look more closely at the Minnesota researchers' explanations for the negative effect in both studies that the omega-6s apparently had, but for now the takeaway is that saturated fat is not the best choice for the lion's share of your fat sourcing, but high amounts of linoleic acid are likely even worse for you.
The ratio of oleic and linoleic are shown in Table 3, result shows that almond contains high value (2.00) for oleic/linoleic ratio followed by pistachio (1.69), peanut (1.19), pine nuts (0.76) and walnut (0.37), which point out that the high oleic acid will liable for the lower level of linoleic acid and increase in ratio of oleic/linoleic, further it would exhibit longer shelf life, increase stability of oil and nutritional value [40].
If the effects of high linoleic acid are the same in rats and humans, this would suggest that women of child-bearing age should consider reducing the amount of linoleic acid in their diet.
It's not known if the same effects would be seen in humans or how much linoleic acid may be harmful.