linkage


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linkage

 [lingk´ij]
1. the connection between different atoms in a chemical compound, or the symbol representing it in structural formulas; see also bond.
2. in genetics, the association of genes having loci on the same chromosome, which results in the tendency of a group of such nonallelic genes to be associated in inheritance.

link·age

(lingk'ăj),
1. A chemical covalent bond.
2. The relationship between syntenic loci sufficiently close that the respective alleles are not inherited independently by the offspring; a characteristic of loci, not genes.

linkage

/link·age/ (lingk´ij)
1. the connection between different atoms in a chemical compound, or the symbol representing it in structural formulas; see also bond.
2. in genetics, the association of genes having loci on the same chromosome, which results in the tendency of a group of such nonallelic genes to be associated in inheritance.
3. in psychology, the connection between a stimulus and its response.

linkage

(lĭng′kĭj)
n.
1.
a. The act or process of linking.
b. The condition of being linked.
2. A connection or relation; an association.
3. A negotiating policy of making agreement on one issue dependent on progress toward another objective.
4. A system of interconnected machine elements, such as rods, springs, and pivots, used to transmit power or motion.
5. Electricity A measure of the induced voltage in a circuit caused by a magnetic flux and equal to the flux times the number of turns in the coil that surrounds it.
6. Genetics An association between two or more genes such that the traits they control tend to be inherited together.

linkage

[ling′kij]
Etymology: Gk, linke, connection
1 (in genetics) the location of two or more genes on the same chromosome so that they do not segregate independently during meiosis but tend to be transmitted together as a unit. The closer the loci of the genes, the more likely they are to be inherited as a group and associated with a specific trait, whereas the farther apart they are, the greater the chance that they will be separated by crossing over and carried on homologous chromosomes. The concept of linkage, which opposes the independent assortment theory of mendelian genetics, led to the foundation of the modern chromosome theory of genetics. See also synteny.
2 (in psychology) the association between a stimulus and the response it elicits.
3 (in chemistry) the bond between two atoms in a chemical compound or the lines used to designate valency connections between the atoms in structural formulas.

link·age

(lingk'ăj)
1. A chemical covalent bond.
2. The relationship between syntenic loci sufficiently close that the respective alleles are not inherited independently by the offspring; a characteristic of loci, not genes.

linkage

1. The location of genes on the same CHROMOSOME so that the characteristics they determine tend to remain associated.
2. The tendency of genes to remain together during recombination. This is proportional to their proximity to each other. Sex linkage simply implies that the particular gene is located on an X or a Y chromosome.
3. The force that holds atoms together in a molecule.

linkage,

n 1. in genetics, the location of two genes on the same chromosome such that they are typically transmitted as a cohesive unit during meiosis.
2. in psychology, the relationship between a response and its stimulus.

link·age

(lingk'ăj)
1. A chemical covalent bond.
2. Form of connection between and among things.

linkage (ling´kəj),

n the connection between two or more objects. In computer programming, coding that connects two separately coded routines.
linkage, cross,
linkage, sex,
n the inheritance of certain characteristics that are determined by genes located in the sex chromosomes.

linkage

1. the connection between different atoms in a chemical compound, or the symbol representing it in structural formulae. See also bond.
2. in genetics, the association of genes having located on the same chromosome, which results in the tendency of a group of such nonallelic genes to be associated in inheritance (linkage disequilibrium). Called also syntenic group.

disequilibrium linkage
the inheritance of two alleles together at a higher than expected frequency.
linkage map
see genetic map.
References in periodicals archive ?
Each observation in the dataset is assigned to one distinct cluster, then distances between each pair of the objects of the clusters are calculated and the closest pair of clusters according to the linkage criteria is merged into one cluster continuously.
When the 416 AFLP markers were suffered to two-point linkage analysis using JoinMap 3.
The Pearson's correlation coefficient between the number of markers per linkage group and the total length of the linkage group was calculated to evaluate the random distribution of markers throughout the maps.
The Emirates ID pointed out that the strategy of electronic linkage with UAE government entities 2012-2015 would contribute to streamlining government services, easing transactions and procedures, reducing costs, minimizing paper consumption and providing ID management services to the UAE federal and local government organizations through engineering a range of flexible services that can be developed and harmonized.
The county DSS identifies Linkages as a partnership between CWS and participant services.
For this reason, the development of data linkage methods using a combination of non-unique variables, such as demographic (e.
On 13th January 2010 the Supreme Court issued a groundbreaking decision on the interpretation of the Linkage Regulation, which has been in force for six years.
Strengthening foreign linkages and participation in the global value chain (GVC) exerts a positive impact on both process and product innovation of Filipino companies, according to a new study released by a state-run think tank.
Muhammad Ashraf, has said on Wednesday that academia industry linkages have become vital of educational and economic uplift.
KARACHI -- Pakistan Science Foundation Chairman Dr Muhammad Ashraf said that academia, industry linkages have become vital of educational and economic uplift.
The Chairman of Pakistan Science Foundation (PAF), Dr Muhammad Ashraf, said on Wednesday that academia industry linkages have become vital of educational and economic uplift.