liniment


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Related to liniment: Horse liniment

liniment

 [lin´ĭ-ment]
a medicinal preparation in an oily, soapy, or alcoholic vehicle, intended to be rubbed on the skin as a counterirritant or anodyne.
Miller-Keane Encyclopedia and Dictionary of Medicine, Nursing, and Allied Health, Seventh Edition. © 2003 by Saunders, an imprint of Elsevier, Inc. All rights reserved.

lin·i·ment

(lin'i-ment), Avoid the misspelling linament.
A liquid preparation for external application or application to the gums; they may be clear dispersions, suspensions, or emulsions, and are frequently applied by friction to the skin; used as counterirritants, rubefacients, anodynes, or cleansing agents.
[L., fr. lino, to smear]
Farlex Partner Medical Dictionary © Farlex 2012

liniment

(lĭn′ə-mənt)
n.
A medicinal fluid rubbed into the skin to soothe pain or relieve stiffness.
The American Heritage® Medical Dictionary Copyright © 2007, 2004 by Houghton Mifflin Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Company. All rights reserved.

liniment

Herbal medicine
A format for delivering a herbal medicine in which an extract of the herb is infused in an oil, alcohol or other volatile base, often heated and applied topically.
Segen's Medical Dictionary. © 2012 Farlex, Inc. All rights reserved.

lin·i·ment

(lin'i-mĕnt)
A liquid preparation for external use, frequently applied by friction to the skin.
Medical Dictionary for the Health Professions and Nursing © Farlex 2012

liniment

An irritating fluid rubbed into the skin to promote a mild inflammatory increase in the blood supply to the underlying tissues. Liniments are of limited therapeutic value, but usually have an impressive smell.
Collins Dictionary of Medicine © Robert M. Youngson 2004, 2005

lin·i·ment

(lin'i-mĕnt)
Liquid preparation for external application or application to gingiva; frequently applied by friction to skin; used as counterirritants, rubefacients, or cleansing agents.
Medical Dictionary for the Dental Professions © Farlex 2012
References in periodicals archive ?
It has been long before other liniments came out and it has survived the test of time.
This randomized, double-blind, parallel groups, non-inferiority trial was conducted to compare the efficacy and safety of Artemisia absinthium ointment and liniment versus piroxicam gel.
Later the animal was given physiotherapy for three weeks twice a week by applying Galvanic 20 stimulation followed by massage by liniment ammonia.
It is here that the smell of liniment oozes from this excellent book.
Demanding to be read aloud, the story, set in 1970, unravels in a sad and seedy West Virginian racetrack, which in Gordon's hands is really a sensorium, her prose miring you in the mud of it ("The sun beat down and by three the red dirt glowed back and around each barn and strip of grass like the works of a toaster"); the stink of it ("the dark blue restless air fragrant with medicinals, Absorbine, liniment, pine tar"), the shrillness and stillness of it ("And alongside of her, rolling so slow in the dirt road it made less sound than
Slob, we'll call him - as he takes a break from his chores to rub more liniment on his back, only to be informed by his wife that the old belief in snowflake exceptionalism is a myth.
After a brief discussion it was decided that some horse liniment would effect the speediest of cures, even though the soft human skin is a great deal more tender than a horse's hair-covered hide.
Absorbine Veterinary Liniment was introduced in 1892 as a formula to ease the muscle pain of horses.
Let's have a laugh and a good crack, don't forget the liniment!
It can be used as antibiotic, disinfectant and liniment. It is also used as remedy for narcotic poisons, convulsions, dyspeptic complaints and dropsy.
The liniment made from Neem oil is used for curing rheumatism.
Sloane's Liniment does nothing much to cure backaches, and Dodd's Kidney Pills are only a means for him to make his piss run a fashionable blue amongst his peers.