lime

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lime

 [līm]
1. calcium oxide, a corrosively alkaline and caustic earth, CaO; having various industrial uses and also a pharmaceutic necessity.
2. the acid fruit of Citrus aurantifolia, which contains ascorbic acid.
Miller-Keane Encyclopedia and Dictionary of Medicine, Nursing, and Allied Health, Seventh Edition. © 2003 by Saunders, an imprint of Elsevier, Inc. All rights reserved.

lime

(līm),
1. an alkaline earth oxide occurring in grayish white masses (quicklime); on exposure to the atmosphere it becomes converted into calcium hydrate and calcium carbonate (air-slaked lime); direct addition of water to calcium oxide produces calcium hydrate (slaked lime). Synonym(s): calcium oxide, calx (1)
2. Fruit of the lime tree, Citrus medica (family Rutaceae), which is a source of ascorbic acid and acts as an antiscorbutic agent.
[O.E. līm, birdlime]
Farlex Partner Medical Dictionary © Farlex 2012

lime

(līm)
1. An alkaline earth oxide occurring in grayish-white masses (quicklime); on exposure to the atmosphere it becomes converted into calcium hydrate and calcium carbonate (air-slaked lime); direct addition of water to calcium oxide produces calcium hydrate (slaked lime).
Synonym(s): calx (1) .
2. Fruit of the lime tree, Citrus medica, which is a source of ascorbic acid and acts as an antiscorbutic agent.
[A.S. līm, birdlime]
Medical Dictionary for the Health Professions and Nursing © Farlex 2012

lime

(līm)
1. An alkaline earth oxide occurring in grayish white masses (quicklime); on exposure to the atmosphere it converts into calcium hydrate and calcium carbonate (air-slaked lime); direct addition of water to calcium oxide produces calcium hydrate (slaked lime).
Synonym(s): calx (1) .
2. Fruit of the lime tree, Citrus medica (family Rutaceae), which is a source of ascorbic acid and acts as a therapeutic antiscorbutic agent in treating scurvy.
[A.S. līm, birdlime]
Medical Dictionary for the Dental Professions © Farlex 2012
References in periodicals archive ?
Limy bile syndrome may rarely be associated with long- term use of total parenteral nutrition, hereditary spherocytosis, primary biliary cirrhosis, or primary hyperparathyroidism.3,4
The CDA Institute also undertakes directed research for its annual limy Paper and quarterly journal ON TRACK.
Soil poverty, limy circumstances, and salinity of waters may risk the society's health and nutritive security.
'limy Harrison the Playwright." In Sandie Byrne, ed., Tony Harrison: Lather.
Baby's bones are soft for a long time and even holding the baby habitually Limy cause spinal curvature.
But wThe it was the rest that was much harder to take off and it took a httle over a year before I was back limy pre-baby shape.
By manual finishing, painting works in particular, the great attention is given to preservation steam-proofness of walls owing to what the oil paint and other covering form a dense film are strictly limited, and the preference is given to limy, glutinous and si-organic colorful coverings.
This host plant is probably the most widely used in areas with a limy substrate throughout their distribution.
The adjacent massive sulphide stock-work veins above this limy (calcic) carbonate unit are a good indication that the carbonate unit may have served as a trap for concentrating hydrothermal sulphide solutions.
Callot (1999) reports that the roots and the microflora associated with limy soils create microsites of acidified soils which enable the dissolution of calcareous rock.
The BC member is composed almost entirely of black quartzose argillite, siltite and phyllite, and includes very minor limy argillites and a few dark grey quartzites.
its altitudinal distribution goes from 0 to 1300 m and it adapts to a great variety of soils from limy to volcanic soils (Niembro 1986).