liminal


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liminal

 [lim´ĭ-nal]
barely perceptible; pertaining to a threshold.

lim·i·nal

(lim'i-năl),
1. Pertaining to a threshold.
2. Pertaining to a stimulus just strong enough to excite a tissue, for example, nerve or muscle.
[L. limen (limin-), a threshold]

liminal

/lim·i·nal/ (lim´ĭ-n'l) barely perceptible; pertaining to a threshold.

liminal

(lĭm′ə-nəl)
adj.
Existing at the limen. Used of stimuli.

lim′i·nal′i·ty (-năl′ĭ-tē) n.
lim′i·nal·ly adv.

lim·i·nal

(lim'i-năl)
1. Pertaining to a threshold.
2. Pertaining to a stimulus just strong enough to excite a tissue, e.g., nerve or muscle.

liminal

a stimulus just strong enough to excite, e.g. nerve tissue, muscle contraction

liminal

Pertaining to a threshold.

lim·i·nal

(lim'i-năl)
Pertaining to a threshold.

liminal

barely perceptible; pertaining to a threshold.
References in periodicals archive ?
The logic of the chapter, similar to the other chapters of the book, follows a well-defined deconstructive trait informed by deMan's (Allegories of Reading) and Nietzsche's (Human, All Too Human) concepts of the reversal of cause and effect, where the cause is the result of the reconstruction of what happened after the event had an effect on the environment: this argument is used to illustrate how Lem's fiction drifts towards a liminal space between detective fiction and science fiction.
The twist on "philanthropic pretence" is the foundational practice of the liminal ritual and the reason why Conrad returns to liminal and Gothic conventions repeatedly in his works for its expression (qtd.
Liminal states are transitional states where old structures are suspended and new ones are yet to be introduced.
DeLillo characterizes other liminal zones such as the Kazakh Test Site as coordinates to be resurveyed because, again described as "[w]hite space on map" (789), they are regions containing waste that "has to disappear somehow" (795).
Aeneas is not the only liminal figure in Book VI of The Aeneid, nor is he the only liminal hero to appear in epics, the grandeur of which, to a large extent, hinges on thresholds and boundaries ushering in new beginnings.
George Hutchinson's 1986 text, The Ecstatic Whitman: Literary Shamanism and the Crisis of the Union, offers perhaps the most insightful interpretations of Whitman's liminal interpretations of the war, and Hutchinson's argument that Whitman's career is best read as "a form of ecstatic prophetism" is impressively sustained by insights on Turner's theories and their intersection with literary shamanism.
As Taljard concludes her article on Krog: "It would therefore appear that there is a definite correlation between being in a liminal zone and actions that may lead to peace and reconciliation between people" (transi.
However, little is understood about how people talk about these liminal experiences that are at times beyond words, uncertain, and difficult to speak of.
The chief announcement was that Liminal will be launching a consumer psychology VR platform early next year for Google Daydream and Gear VR.
Of all the typologies of knights, Umland argues, the "true or spiritual knight" has "enjoyed the most lasting influence in the western imagination" (14) and stems from Malory's Lancelot, who functions as a liminal outlaw hero, seeking justice by negotiating various legal and moral codes and temporarily retreating into inner solitude.
Liminal thinking is the art of getting in this transition space to look at your beliefs in a new way in order to facilitate change.
We journeyed inward into the liminal space of our heritage as shared spirituality and historical legacy empowered us with the tools to challenge, disrupt, and renegotiate the hegemonic construction of the Other (Butler, 2015) as, instead, a living breathing culture of resistance running parallel and equal to Western practice.