limes


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li·mes (L),

(lī'mēz), The plural of this word is lim'ites, not limes.
A boundary, limit, or threshold.
See also: L doses.
[L.]

li·mes

(lī'mēz)
A boundary, limit, or threshold.
See also: L doses
[L.]

li·mes

(L) (lī'mēz)
A boundary or threshold.
[L.]
References in periodicals archive ?
* Limes may relieve pain associated with sickle cell anemia.
He also adapted other measures to suit the local environment and began growing limes full-time in 2013.
The vitamin C and antioxidants in limes can strengthen your immune system and help your body fight off infections such as the cold and flu virus.
Horticulturalist Lin Chin-wen from Xinhua District in Tainan City told CNA that after six years of cultivation, Australian finger lime trees suitable to Taiwan's climate have successfully blossomed at small scale.
Improves skin quality Limes contain vitamin C and antioxidants, both of which are ingredients in many commercial skin products.
Maybe it's because, lacking a supply of limes, these restaurants use lemon or calamansi instead, which isn't the same at all.
To help you master the Margarita and try some tricks of the trade, here are some 100% blue agave blanco tequilas that can be sipped on their own over ice, but taste delicious with lime juice, a salt rim and a measure of sweetness...
Once the syrup has completely cooled down, pour in the apple juice followed by the lime juice and tequila and stir to combine.
The lime crop in Mexico, which produces more than 90% of the limes now consumed in the U.S., has suffered from heavy rainfall and disease.
Alaska Airlines stopped putting limes in in-flight beverages a couple of weeks ago.
The Mexico City daily business newspaper El Financiero pointed out that prices rose despite a nearly 200% increase in the amount of limes imported from overseas in January and February.