lime

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lime

 [līm]
1. calcium oxide, a corrosively alkaline and caustic earth, CaO; having various industrial uses and also a pharmaceutic necessity.
2. the acid fruit of Citrus aurantifolia, which contains ascorbic acid.
Miller-Keane Encyclopedia and Dictionary of Medicine, Nursing, and Allied Health, Seventh Edition. © 2003 by Saunders, an imprint of Elsevier, Inc. All rights reserved.

lime

(līm),
1. an alkaline earth oxide occurring in grayish white masses (quicklime); on exposure to the atmosphere it becomes converted into calcium hydrate and calcium carbonate (air-slaked lime); direct addition of water to calcium oxide produces calcium hydrate (slaked lime). Synonym(s): calcium oxide, calx (1)
2. Fruit of the lime tree, Citrus medica (family Rutaceae), which is a source of ascorbic acid and acts as an antiscorbutic agent.
[O.E. līm, birdlime]
Farlex Partner Medical Dictionary © Farlex 2012

lime

(līm)
1. An alkaline earth oxide occurring in grayish-white masses (quicklime); on exposure to the atmosphere it becomes converted into calcium hydrate and calcium carbonate (air-slaked lime); direct addition of water to calcium oxide produces calcium hydrate (slaked lime).
Synonym(s): calx (1) .
2. Fruit of the lime tree, Citrus medica, which is a source of ascorbic acid and acts as an antiscorbutic agent.
[A.S. līm, birdlime]
Medical Dictionary for the Health Professions and Nursing © Farlex 2012

lime

(līm)
1. An alkaline earth oxide occurring in grayish white masses (quicklime); on exposure to the atmosphere it converts into calcium hydrate and calcium carbonate (air-slaked lime); direct addition of water to calcium oxide produces calcium hydrate (slaked lime).
Synonym(s): calx (1) .
2. Fruit of the lime tree, Citrus medica (family Rutaceae), which is a source of ascorbic acid and acts as a therapeutic antiscorbutic agent in treating scurvy.
[A.S. līm, birdlime]
Medical Dictionary for the Dental Professions © Farlex 2012
References in periodicals archive ?
The potential for non-exchangeable Ca ([Ca.sub.non-ex]) to form was investigated in a subset of surface soil samples as [Delta]Ca minus residual undissolved Ca[CO.sub.3], where [Delta]Ca (namely, [Delta][Ca.sub.HCI] - [Delta][Ca.sub.Ba]) is the difference between the limed and unlimed treatments in the amount of Ca extracted by 1:10 0.2 M HCl or 1:10 0.1 M Ba[Cl.sub.2] buffered to pH 8.2 in triethanolamine (see Table 4).
where [Delta]Ca is a significant difference (P [is less than] 0.05) in 0.01 M Ba[Cl.sub.2]-extractable Ca between limed and unlimed treatments, M is the weight of soil (with particle size [is less than] 2 mm) per ha in each sampling layer, subscript i denotes a layer of soil, and K converts the values to t/ha Ca[CO.sub.3].
Greater stability of the [is less than] 50 [micro]m fraction (lower percentage breakdown) was first detected in the limed cultivated soils but not in the direct-drilled soil (Fig.
Statistical significance of the ratio of water stability of limed and unlimed soils under different management treatments 1 and 3 years after lime application Depth 1 year (cm) DD CC1 CC2 DD Macroaggregates (>2 mm) 0-2.5 (*) n.s.