lime

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lime

 [līm]
1. calcium oxide, a corrosively alkaline and caustic earth, CaO; having various industrial uses and also a pharmaceutic necessity.
2. the acid fruit of Citrus aurantifolia, which contains ascorbic acid.
Miller-Keane Encyclopedia and Dictionary of Medicine, Nursing, and Allied Health, Seventh Edition. © 2003 by Saunders, an imprint of Elsevier, Inc. All rights reserved.

lime

(līm),
1. an alkaline earth oxide occurring in grayish white masses (quicklime); on exposure to the atmosphere it becomes converted into calcium hydrate and calcium carbonate (air-slaked lime); direct addition of water to calcium oxide produces calcium hydrate (slaked lime). Synonym(s): calcium oxide, calx (1)
2. Fruit of the lime tree, Citrus medica (family Rutaceae), which is a source of ascorbic acid and acts as an antiscorbutic agent.
[O.E. līm, birdlime]
Farlex Partner Medical Dictionary © Farlex 2012

lime

(līm)
1. An alkaline earth oxide occurring in grayish-white masses (quicklime); on exposure to the atmosphere it becomes converted into calcium hydrate and calcium carbonate (air-slaked lime); direct addition of water to calcium oxide produces calcium hydrate (slaked lime).
Synonym(s): calx (1) .
2. Fruit of the lime tree, Citrus medica, which is a source of ascorbic acid and acts as an antiscorbutic agent.
[A.S. līm, birdlime]
Medical Dictionary for the Health Professions and Nursing © Farlex 2012

lime

(līm)
1. An alkaline earth oxide occurring in grayish white masses (quicklime); on exposure to the atmosphere it converts into calcium hydrate and calcium carbonate (air-slaked lime); direct addition of water to calcium oxide produces calcium hydrate (slaked lime).
Synonym(s): calx (1) .
2. Fruit of the lime tree, Citrus medica (family Rutaceae), which is a source of ascorbic acid and acts as a therapeutic antiscorbutic agent in treating scurvy.
[A.S. līm, birdlime]
Medical Dictionary for the Dental Professions © Farlex 2012
References in periodicals archive ?
Left: Steal all the attention in sexy spaghetti-strapped lime-green gown with sheer overlay with pink, orange and burgundy embroidery and high split on one side.
By the time the Off Beat section came up my favourite, hence the lime-green, all-in-one catsuit I was beside myself.
Marching up the southfacing slopes are the ordered ranks of larch and Ponderosa pines, their twig-ends jaunty in new lime-green growth, contrasting nicely with the darker undercoats of previous years.
Mrs York, by email AHONESTY and wood spurge (Euphorbia amygdaloides) look great together with magenta and lime-green flowers respectively.
Its chunky flowerheads gather themselves together during April, a tight-packed bouquet of vivid lime-green bracts nestling in soft green leaves with a touch of pink.
Its chunky flowerheads gather themselves together during April - - a tight-packed bouquet of vivid lime-green bracts nestling in soft green leaves with a touch of pink.
Presumably, then, he's responsible for the snappy little lime-green finish on her heels, seen here at the ESPY Awards in LA.
Kendall picked up some lime-green wrapping paper to wrap her bulletin board (and got some funky flower-y pushpins) so it stands out with the rest of her room's new electrifying colors.
'Frances Williams' is a good bet, with big, thick waxy leaves which have an irregular lime-green marking around the edge.
Predicting styles for spring-summer 2001, British designer Roland Mouret took the cleavage to extremes with a lime-green chiffon tunic and pantaloon set.
Or get even fruitier in a green, floral-patterned shirt, pounds 12, worn with lime-green skirt, pounds 11, above, both from Miss Selfridge.