limbic


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limbic

 [lim´bik]
pertaining to a limbus, or margin.

lim·bic

(lim'bik),
1. Relating to a limbus.
2. Relating to the limbic system.

limbic

(lĭm′bĭk)
adj.
1. Of, relating to, or characterized by a limbus.
2. Of or relating to the limbic system.

lim·bic

(lim'bik)
1. Relating to a limbus.
2. Relating to the limbic system
References in periodicals archive ?
In intermediate limbic breathing, the inspiration period is prolonged to 10-15 seconds and the warm sensation is to encompass hands, feet, limbs and torso, all at the same time.
The more we are able to use our conscious rational cortex to understand the workings of our limbic instincts and urges, the more we may be able to sever the connection between believing and behaving.
The limbic system is responsible for a great range of emotions - fear, rage, aggression, nostalgia and pleasure, as well as regulating reproductive cycles and the sex drive.
The limbic system is responsible for our emotional functions.
A decrease of the slow waves in non-rapid eye movement (NREM) in patients with N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor associated limbic encephalitis (NMDAR-LE) (8) and presence of phasic electromyography activity during REM periods with insufficient REM sleep in patients with VGKC-LE (9) reduced total sleep time with frequent awakenings as a sign of decreased sleep efficiency (2, 10), and brief sleep fragments consisting of theta activity interspersed with faster rhythms were reported (2, 10).
The limbic system is involved in this pathway and results in the development of negative cognition and emotion, intensifying the patient's attention to tinnitus, resulting in anxiety and fear emotions.[4],[5] This negative emotion further enhances the perception of tinnitus signals, causing a vicious cycle between tinnitus and negative emotion.[6]
Of course there are innate instinctive modules in the brain, performing affective rather than cognitive functions, largely in the limbic system, the subcortical sensory and motor systems, and the autonomic and peripheral nervous systems, well described by the authors.
We retrospectively investigated a case of unexplained fatal limbic encephalitis in a seronegative animal caretaker at a zoological garden in northern Germany in 2013.
She chose 30 minutes of walking at lunchtime and to limbic breathe whenever she found herself breathing shallowly.
"If you can shut off the limbic system for just 15 to 20 minutes," Anderson says, "you don't really have the negative effects."
Limbic encephalitis (LE) was first described by Brierley in 1960 and its association with cancer was first noted in 1968, which was characterized by subacute progressive impairment of short-term memory, psychiatric features, and seizures.
In the limbic region, female brains functioned well, this area is regarded as emotion and memory controller.