likelihood

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like·li·hood

(līk'lē-hud),
A statement of the chance that an unknown quantity in reality has a particular value based on the readiness with which it would account for a given set of data; in this way the merits of various competing interpretations may be compared.

Patient discussion about likelihood

Q. What is the likelihood of my depression returning? I have a history of severe depression. My mom is very against medication and counseling, and reluctantly allowed me to go on the lowest dosage of zoloft. It helped, but now she wants me to go off of it and stop going to my doctor. My fear is that my depression will return. What are the chances of my depression returning, and how can I handle it if and when it does?

A. hi kelly17 i agree with eleanor55, i donot have bi-polar-but it seems to me that the problem isnt YOU/it your mother-Im going to be real here-if your mother knows that the meds help why is she stopping them--I think the stigma of the disease is her problem,like the other members said, and if she is doing this to you for that reason/BAD ON HER---at 17 i think you are under age--I dont want to start a family feud but i think this is child abuse--talk to soom one at school teacher/ect----stay strong things get better with time you have a lot of friends her USE THEM---mrfot56

More discussions about likelihood
References in classic literature ?
He moved quite close to the bush with the slow movement Mary had noticed before, and then he made a sound almost like the robin's own twitter.
He told her what they looked like when they were flowers; he told her how to plant them, and watch them, and feed and water them.
I was only just like the robin, and they wouldn't take it from the robin." "Where is it?" asked Dickon in a dropped voice.
"No; you kept your word, and stood by me like a good boy.
Shaw don't like it, nor grandma either, I dare say.
The girls all do, and say I ought to have Fweddy Lovell; but I don't like him as well as Hawry Fiske."
She sighed for a locket, and, for the first time in her life, thought seriously of turning up her pretty curls and putting on a "wad." She kept these discontents to herself, however, after she had written to ask her mother if she might have her best dress altered like Fanny's, and received this reply: "No, dear; the dress is proper and becoming as it is, and the old fashion of simplicity the best for all of us.
"You may call me Mary, if you like; but I won't have any ie put on to my name.
I like to pay my debts, so I know you will allow `the old gentleman' to send you something which once belonged to the little grand daughter he lost.
When she went home, he walked with her to her own gate, shook hands cordially, and touched his hat as he marched back again, looking very stately and erect, like a handsome, soldierly old gentleman, as he was.
He looks a lot like his father did at the same age.
"He is just away now; and he likes to know it just the same.