lignum vitae


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lignum vitae

Herbal medicine
A Caribbean tree that is rich in saponins, resin, guaiaretic and guaiacolic acids; it is anti-inflammatory, laxative and stimulatory, and has been used to treat arthritis and gout; its products have been commercialised in mainstream medicine in the guaiac test for occult bleeding of the large intestine, which is often a sign of colorectal cancer.
References in periodicals archive ?
Assim, a pagina 71 do Lignum vitae preve: "cave ne mentis tuae oculis infirmum aliquid carnalis cogitationis occurrat" (CALLAEY, 1912, p.
That's because it's made of the hardest and densest of all the trade woods: lignum vitae.
Lignum vitae is the name given to wood from trees of the genus Guaiacum, which are all now considered endangered species.
Lignum vitae has a number of properties that make it unusual.
Its weight and hardness have also made lignum vitae popular for lawn bowls, croquet mallets and skittle balls, not to mention police truncheons.
The 17th century wassail bowls made of beautiful lignum vitae stood proud on the side tables in the main banqueting hall, which now some 400 years later has become the entertaining lounge.
Gwyn still uses his set of 1950s bowls made of heavy, lignum vitae wood from the West Indies.
Assistant sales manager Ken Lupton said that what made the company so unique was its ability to restore and repair original Lignum Vitae bowls.
Pieces of treen can be bought for as little as pounds 20-30 or in excess of pounds 10,000 for a 17th-century lignum vitae wassail bowl.
Very early examples in lignum vitae are highly desirable but there are also examples in maple.