lignin


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Related to lignin: hemicellulose

lignin

 [lig´nin]
a woody substance closely associated with cellulose in plants and grouped with the polysaccharides, although it is not actually a carbohydrate; it combines with bile acids to prevent their absorption. Lignin fibers are less digestible by gut bacteria than other polysaccharides.

lig·nin

(lig'nin),
A random polymer of coniferyl alcohol accompanying cellulose and present in vegetable fiber and wood cells; a source of vanillin (by oxidation of lignin); lignin composition varies with plant species. It is one of the most abundant biopolymers in nature.
[L. lignum, wood]

lignin

(lĭg′nĭn)
n.
A complex polymer, the chief noncarbohydrate constituent of wood, that binds to cellulose fibers and hardens and strengthens the cell walls of plants.

lignin

[lig′nin]
Etymology: L, lignum, wood
an insoluble polysaccharide that with cellulose and hemicellulose forms the chief part of the skeletal substances of the cell walls of plants. It provides bulk in the diet necessary for proper GI functioning. See also dietary fiber.

lig·nin

(lig'nin)
A water-insoluble fiber found in wheat bran, whole grains, and vegetables.
[L. lignum, wood]

lignin

a complex, noncarbohydrate polymer found in cell walls, whose function is to provide mechanical support to the cell, as in xylem VESSELS and bark fibres. Such cells are said to be ‘lignified’, the lignin being laid down by the cell on the inside of the cellulose cell wall and, since lignin forms an impermeable barrier, the cells are dead.

lig·nin

(lig'nin)
A water-insoluble fiber found in wheat bran, whole grains, and vegetables.
[L. lignum, wood]

lignin (lig´nin),

n the heteropolysaccharides contained in the cell walls of plants that provides dietary fiber for digestion.

lignin

an almost completely indigestible plant polyphenol present in large quantities in wood, hulls and straw.
References in periodicals archive ?
These cells showed walls having a thick inner layer (G-layer), consisting of [alpha]-cellulose with little to no lignin (Costa, 2006).
The methods of Vengal & Srikumar [1] were followed in preparation of starch: lignin and starch-only films, with exception of the lignin source.
Hence, the choice of an effective pretreatment strategy relies on the cost effectiveness and the rate of cellulose hydrolysis or lignin removal.
It shows that the values of [alpha]- cellulose and lignin in raw materials are 60% which and 25% are on higher side while extractive content are on lower side.
Meanwhile, Jean-Luc Carriere - vice president and general manager lignin for CellMark Basic Chemicals - affirmed that the agreement would allow both parties "to advance towards their common goal to expand markets and applications for this versatile biopolymer.
The results showed a higher percentage of lignin and ash as compared to other agricultural roughages as has been reported by(Xuebinget.
The lignin concentration gradually increased from the BS stage, and peaked during the GFS stage (Fig.
One of the promising areas of application of lignin is in the production of carbonized fibers.
1] reduced, and it shown lignin participated in the self-bonding reaction.
Lignin is the second most abundant polymer in nature after cellulose, appears as promising candidate.
Until now, three approaches for preparing lignin-containing epoxy resin were summarized as follows [10]: (a) lignin as filler and epoxy resin as blender [11-13]; (b) synthesizing with alkaline lignin and epichlorohydrin [14, 15]; (c) synthesizing with modified lignin [16, 17] (lignin and its derivatives previously modified by chemical methods such as phcnolation, hydroxymcthlation, or hydroxypropylation [18, 19]) and epichlorohydrin.
Lignin is an organic substance, binding the plant cells with a complex structure with distinctive variations among wood species.