lignin


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Related to lignin: hemicellulose

lignin

 [lig´nin]
a woody substance closely associated with cellulose in plants and grouped with the polysaccharides, although it is not actually a carbohydrate; it combines with bile acids to prevent their absorption. Lignin fibers are less digestible by gut bacteria than other polysaccharides.

lig·nin

(lig'nin),
A random polymer of coniferyl alcohol accompanying cellulose and present in vegetable fiber and wood cells; a source of vanillin (by oxidation of lignin); lignin composition varies with plant species. It is one of the most abundant biopolymers in nature.
[L. lignum, wood]

lignin

(lĭg′nĭn)
n.
A complex polymer, the chief noncarbohydrate constituent of wood, that binds to cellulose fibers and hardens and strengthens the cell walls of plants.

lignin

[lig′nin]
Etymology: L, lignum, wood
an insoluble polysaccharide that with cellulose and hemicellulose forms the chief part of the skeletal substances of the cell walls of plants. It provides bulk in the diet necessary for proper GI functioning. See also dietary fiber.

lig·nin

(lig'nin)
A water-insoluble fiber found in wheat bran, whole grains, and vegetables.
[L. lignum, wood]

lignin

a complex, noncarbohydrate polymer found in cell walls, whose function is to provide mechanical support to the cell, as in xylem VESSELS and bark fibres. Such cells are said to be ‘lignified’, the lignin being laid down by the cell on the inside of the cellulose cell wall and, since lignin forms an impermeable barrier, the cells are dead.

lig·nin

(lig'nin)
A water-insoluble fiber found in wheat bran, whole grains, and vegetables.
[L. lignum, wood]

lignin (lig´nin),

n the heteropolysaccharides contained in the cell walls of plants that provides dietary fiber for digestion.

lignin

an almost completely indigestible plant polyphenol present in large quantities in wood, hulls and straw.
References in periodicals archive ?
Kraft lignin accounted for over 10% of global market share in 2014.
The report analysts sees the recent move of Borregaard and Sappi to enhance its lignin production by 20,000 tonnes, as the company's strategy to meet the demands from the emerging markets of Asia, the Middle East and Africa.
The aim of our research is to prepare a stable homogeneous epoxy resin with lignin and study the effect of introduction of biomass component--lignin on the thermal-mechanical properties of polymeric material.
The determination of lignin in lignocellulosic material is important for characterizing and evaluating the effects of different treatments (chemical, mechanical, and biological) on wood and pulp.
Lignin is the dominant phenolic substance in biomass, especially in wood.
15] studied the comparison of different pretreatments by subjecting the coconut husk fiber to thermal, acid, alkaline and alkaline pretreatment method based upon microwave assisted technique, and it was found that microwave assisted based alkaline treatment gave the best results in reducing lignin content, thereby increasing cellulose content, followed by alkaline, acid and thermal pretreatment.
We are able to take lignin : which most bio refineries consider waste to be burned for its heat : and turn it into high: value molecules that have applications in fragrance, flavouring and high: octane jet fuels," said Mahdi Abu: Omar, Professor of Chemical Engineering and associate director of C3Bio, who led the team.
A potential solution, Mansfield says, lies with manipulating trees so that they create ester rather than ether molecular bonds, which form the complex linkages that create the backbone of lignin molecules.
Lignin is by-product generated in the pulp manufacturing process.
The results stem from a grant from the UK's innovation agency, the Technology Strategy Board, awarded to a consortium led by Biome Bioplastics in early 2013 to investigate lignin as a new source of organic chemicals for bioplastics manufacture, which could significantly reduce costs and increase performance of these materials.
Lignin is one of the major components of biomass and is a by-product produced in large amounts by the paper and pulp industry.
However lignin, while freely available in wood, has attracted less interest due to low degradability and the issue of some degradation products being harmful to microorganisms.