lignin

(redirected from lignified)
Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus, Encyclopedia.
Related to lignified: lignin

lignin

 [lig´nin]
a woody substance closely associated with cellulose in plants and grouped with the polysaccharides, although it is not actually a carbohydrate; it combines with bile acids to prevent their absorption. Lignin fibers are less digestible by gut bacteria than other polysaccharides.
Miller-Keane Encyclopedia and Dictionary of Medicine, Nursing, and Allied Health, Seventh Edition. © 2003 by Saunders, an imprint of Elsevier, Inc. All rights reserved.

lig·nin

(lig'nin),
A random polymer of coniferyl alcohol accompanying cellulose and present in vegetable fiber and wood cells; a source of vanillin (by oxidation of lignin); lignin composition varies with plant species. It is one of the most abundant biopolymers in nature.
[L. lignum, wood]
Farlex Partner Medical Dictionary © Farlex 2012

lignin

(lĭg′nĭn)
n.
A complex polymer, the chief noncarbohydrate constituent of wood, that binds to cellulose fibers and hardens and strengthens the cell walls of plants.
The American Heritage® Medical Dictionary Copyright © 2007, 2004 by Houghton Mifflin Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Company. All rights reserved.

lig·nin

(lig'nin)
A water-insoluble fiber found in wheat bran, whole grains, and vegetables.
[L. lignum, wood]
Medical Dictionary for the Health Professions and Nursing © Farlex 2012

lignin

a complex, noncarbohydrate polymer found in cell walls, whose function is to provide mechanical support to the cell, as in xylem VESSELS and bark fibres. Such cells are said to be ‘lignified’, the lignin being laid down by the cell on the inside of the cellulose cell wall and, since lignin forms an impermeable barrier, the cells are dead.
Collins Dictionary of Biology, 3rd ed. © W. G. Hale, V. A. Saunders, J. P. Margham 2005

lig·nin

(lig'nin)
A water-insoluble fiber found in wheat bran, whole grains, and vegetables.
[L. lignum, wood]
Medical Dictionary for the Dental Professions © Farlex 2012
References in periodicals archive ?
Primary xylem vessels were all lignified at the youngest maturity stage sampled.
Leaves alternate, decussate, or whorled, sometimes distally clustered on shoots, entire to serrate, and often with margins strongly revolute and leaves needle-like (i.e., ericoid); stipules lacking; i.e., leaf epidermal cells lignified or not, and hypodermal cells often present; stomata usually anomocytic or paracytic; vascular bundles frequently associated with a fiber sheath; nodes usually unilacunar.
Another feature of the Periplocoideae is the lack of any lignified tissue in the margins of the anthers.
Irregular crack-like lines we considered an indication of broken lignified styles (Fig.
This may be justified by the fact that the sunflower crop has greater lignified fiber content, which may end up hindering the silage digestibility.
Moreover, some layers like endodermis and exodermises become more lignified and suberized.Soil salinity has a significant effect on the pulses.
Used only clay from Mymensingh in his study the clay was processed with cellulose organic materials such as de- lignified jute, news paper pulp and saw dust bleached in a solution which is to be acidified with hydrochloric acid or vinegar [3].
This epicotyl structure with age of 10 days is strikingly different from the young stem of Sapindaceae, which is characterized by, among other features, cork arising from the layers below the epidermis, pericycle usually containing strands of sclerenchyma, xylem in the form of a continuous cylinder, and pith generally lignified in tropical species (METCALFE; CHALK, 1957).