lignin

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lignin

 [lig´nin]
a woody substance closely associated with cellulose in plants and grouped with the polysaccharides, although it is not actually a carbohydrate; it combines with bile acids to prevent their absorption. Lignin fibers are less digestible by gut bacteria than other polysaccharides.

lig·nin

(lig'nin),
A random polymer of coniferyl alcohol accompanying cellulose and present in vegetable fiber and wood cells; a source of vanillin (by oxidation of lignin); lignin composition varies with plant species. It is one of the most abundant biopolymers in nature.
[L. lignum, wood]

lignin

(lĭg′nĭn)
n.
A complex polymer, the chief noncarbohydrate constituent of wood, that binds to cellulose fibers and hardens and strengthens the cell walls of plants.

lignin

[lig′nin]
Etymology: L, lignum, wood
an insoluble polysaccharide that with cellulose and hemicellulose forms the chief part of the skeletal substances of the cell walls of plants. It provides bulk in the diet necessary for proper GI functioning. See also dietary fiber.

lig·nin

(lig'nin)
A water-insoluble fiber found in wheat bran, whole grains, and vegetables.
[L. lignum, wood]

lignin

a complex, noncarbohydrate polymer found in cell walls, whose function is to provide mechanical support to the cell, as in xylem VESSELS and bark fibres. Such cells are said to be ‘lignified’, the lignin being laid down by the cell on the inside of the cellulose cell wall and, since lignin forms an impermeable barrier, the cells are dead.

lig·nin

(lig'nin)
A water-insoluble fiber found in wheat bran, whole grains, and vegetables.
[L. lignum, wood]

lignin (lig´nin),

n the heteropolysaccharides contained in the cell walls of plants that provides dietary fiber for digestion.

lignin

an almost completely indigestible plant polyphenol present in large quantities in wood, hulls and straw.
References in periodicals archive ?
Mucilage cells or ducts have thickened, lignified walls.
Other cryptic characters, such as the lignified epidermal cells and the bands of fibers in the secondary phloem, also have been somewhat overlooked in the classification of the family, and a group diagnosed by these characters-the Lyonieae-has only recently received formal taxonomic recognition (Kron & Judd, 1997; Kron et al.
With the exception of the Tabernaemontaneae, which are characterized by the presence of lignified guide rails on the anthers, there are few distinguishing floral characters useful for differentiating among tribes.
However, a better indicator of such conditions is the lignified and spiny shrub Ziziphus lotus, which spreads as green patches all over the area.
Xylans are the main hemicellulose components of secondary cell walls, constituting about 25%-35% of the dry biomass from the woody tissues of dicots and lignified tissues of monocots and occur up to as much as 50% in some tissues of cereal grains [1].
As the stem matures, the cambium produces additional (secondary) bast fibers, which are short (about 2 mm long) and more lignified.
fastidiosa from woody tissues such as 1- to 2-year-old lignified canes (Almeida and Purcell 2003; Almeida et al.
As rice straw was used after threshing the rice grain, it obviously possessed a low degradation rate of nutritive components, starch, protein and lipid, and was highly lignified due to late harvesting time compared to other forage sources which are grown primarily as feedstuff for animals.
These grasses are abundant in the wet season but scarce in the dry season and where available, they are highly lignified.
These slices also showed that the SB not only pierced primary cell walls, but also the lignified secondary walls of the xylem.
Nests were usually constructed of dry palm fronds (Leucothrinax morrisii), lignified vascular tissue of cacti (Cephalocereus spp.