lignin

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lignin

 [lig´nin]
a woody substance closely associated with cellulose in plants and grouped with the polysaccharides, although it is not actually a carbohydrate; it combines with bile acids to prevent their absorption. Lignin fibers are less digestible by gut bacteria than other polysaccharides.

lig·nin

(lig'nin),
A random polymer of coniferyl alcohol accompanying cellulose and present in vegetable fiber and wood cells; a source of vanillin (by oxidation of lignin); lignin composition varies with plant species. It is one of the most abundant biopolymers in nature.
[L. lignum, wood]

lignin

(lĭg′nĭn)
n.
A complex polymer, the chief noncarbohydrate constituent of wood, that binds to cellulose fibers and hardens and strengthens the cell walls of plants.

lignin

[lig′nin]
Etymology: L, lignum, wood
an insoluble polysaccharide that with cellulose and hemicellulose forms the chief part of the skeletal substances of the cell walls of plants. It provides bulk in the diet necessary for proper GI functioning. See also dietary fiber.

lig·nin

(lig'nin)
A water-insoluble fiber found in wheat bran, whole grains, and vegetables.
[L. lignum, wood]

lignin

a complex, noncarbohydrate polymer found in cell walls, whose function is to provide mechanical support to the cell, as in xylem VESSELS and bark fibres. Such cells are said to be ‘lignified’, the lignin being laid down by the cell on the inside of the cellulose cell wall and, since lignin forms an impermeable barrier, the cells are dead.

lig·nin

(lig'nin)
A water-insoluble fiber found in wheat bran, whole grains, and vegetables.
[L. lignum, wood]

lignin (lig´nin),

n the heteropolysaccharides contained in the cell walls of plants that provides dietary fiber for digestion.

lignin

an almost completely indigestible plant polyphenol present in large quantities in wood, hulls and straw.
References in periodicals archive ?
Jinhui-2###One layers of closely spaced lignified sclerenchymatous cells###Fig.
When compared to the amphibious species, such anatomical features as the reduction of the supporting system, the decrease in number or absence of stomata, less numerous conducting elements and less lignified cells in the xylem were more significant in the emergent species.
In MLG, the two layers of cells just below the epidermis lignified, a feature not observed in YLG even after insects emergence.
2011) that presents difficulties for the propagation by seeds (LORENZI, 2002) due to the presence of extremely lignified endocarps (SOUTO & OLIVEIRA, 2005).
The underlying causes for concentration of short cells (and hence silica-bearing cells) over the veins remain unknown, though there is an apparent positive correlation between silica deposition and the proximity of the lignified tissues of the vascular bundles.
Herbivore preference for young leaves may also be related to the leaves' higher rate of cellular division and growth and the lack of a secondary lignified cell wall, which makes them softer, facilitating their mastication and digestion (VARANDA et al.
This species has all the morphoanatomical features of xerophytes: cuticle on leaf epidermis, hypodermis aquifer, vascular bundle hem, hem extension lignified, and little intercellular space in chlorenchyma.
We therefore expected differences in ant activity between young cladodes (identified by the presence of true leaves) and older, lignified cladodes.
In work reviewed by Wilkins (1966), lignin was more closely related to in situ digestibility of organic matter and dry matter and the potential digestibility of cellulose which was contained in NDF had significant negative correlations with both lignin content and lignified tissue (Wilkins, 1972).
The second is an internal zone described by Tomlinson (1990) as the "cortex" or "cortical area", which consists of reduced, dense and highly lignified vascular tissue with fibers.
Idlib-4 plants have better lignified strong stems and branches with erect growth habit, thus providing lodging resistance and are suitable for mechanical harvesting.