happiness

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happiness

(hăp′ē-nĕs) [ME.]
A subjective sense of well-being. A bright and positive outlook toward life.
Medical Dictionary, © 2009 Farlex and Partners
References in periodicals archive ?
"There is a certain 'lightheartedness' to some of the flavour combinations, so we wanted to capture this in the brand positioning and packaging design.
rhythm, sound, and energy of it invoke a lightheartedness of mind and
There are whimsical and fun moments throughout The Speaker for the Trees despite its serious overtones, which will delight readers who enjoy a dash of lightheartedness along with the unexpected: "He knew she was worrying that his ulcers were boiling or that he didn't enjoy the pork chops.
The mix of lightheartedness and noise abuse is a seam running through Ruggiero's back catalogue.
Her naivete allows Toda to observe and comment on the strange behavior of adults and the absurdities of war, giving this otherwise serious tale a paradoxical lightheartedness. The reader gains a sense of involvement from the first person narrative while the author's hand-drawn illustrations add to the sense that this text is written from a child's perspective.
Colourful, cartoon-like illustrations add to the humour and lightheartedness of the poems.
Even though his gun writing dealt with some very serious topics, Jerry always seemed to inject a certain lightheartedness into his work.
While the opening half of the production sizzles with sexual happiness, lovers and lightheartedness, the latter stages are much darker and menacing with uncomfortable prolonged periods of extensive female full frontal nudity.
shared a certain lightheartedness, while Sokolow's Lainent for the Death of a Bullfighter, Ethyl Winter's En Dolor, and Limon's There Is a Time (excerpted) went to darker places.
The second most commonly Googled word after 'Derek Hough' also means full of lightheartedness and merriment, or brightly coloured.
They liked the brightly coloured cartoon illustrations (there is a passing comparison with the Dr Seuss books), the doggerel verses ('London's often cool and clammy/Humid best describes Miami') and the general lightheartedness of the presentation.
"Luka and the Fire of Life" (Random House, $25), by Salman Rushdie: It is hard to overstate the lightheartedness and love with which Salman Rushdie conveys this brief tale of a boy on a quest.