diode

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di·ode

(dī'ōd)
A bipolar device that permits a flow of electrons in only one direction.
Synonym(s): silicone diode.
[di- + -ode fr. anode, cathode]
Medical Dictionary for the Health Professions and Nursing © Farlex 2012
References in periodicals archive ?
Recent research on high-voltage light-emitting diode (HV-LED) has shown that multiple series-connected microdiodes in a single large chip can obtain high forward voltage with a low driving current, thereby reducing current crowing and efficiency droop [20-22].
They also worked with researchers at Samsung to coat the contact lens with a stretchy conductor then placed the light-emitting diode on it.
By internally connecting the base and collector of a light-emitting transistor, they created a new form of light-emitting diode, which modulates at up to 7 gigahertz, breaking the speed record once again.
SSL engines use so-called light-emitting diodes (LEDs), which are more far more energy efficient than incandescent light bulbs.
Recently, in view of the luminance enhancement effect of surface plasmon (SP), the surface plasmon resonance effect (SPRE) of metal nanoparticles has been actively studied in both OLED and inorganic light-emitting diode in [9-12].
For liquid crystal displays and outdoor lightings, white light-emitting diodes (WLEDs) have been extensively used as backlight source due to their eco-friendly features, compact size, and high reliability compared to conventional light sources, such as incandescent bulbs and fluorescent lamps [1-4].
Light-emitting diodes that include two-dimensional, photonic crystals have a similar structure, he notes.
III-V compound semiconductors of A1N, GaN, and InN are suitable materials for light-emitting diodes (LEDs) because of their wurtzite crystal structures and direct band gap characteristics [1].
Kobayashi, "Efficient and high-power AlGaN-based ultraviolet light-emitting diode grown on bulk GaN," Applied Physics Letters, vol.
Sample B is the organic light-emitting diode with a yellow phosphor embedded PDMS film and Sample A has an identical OLEDs device without flexible PDMS film.
The next step, says Hulvat, will be to produce an actual organic light-emitting diode, which glows when stimulated electrically.