condition

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condition

 [kon-dish´un]
1. to train; to subject to conditioning.
2. the state in which an object or person exists.
Miller-Keane Encyclopedia and Dictionary of Medicine, Nursing, and Allied Health, Seventh Edition. © 2003 by Saunders, an imprint of Elsevier, Inc. All rights reserved.

con·di·tion

(kon-dish'ŭn),
1. To train; to undergo conditioning.
2. A certain response elicited by a specifiable stimulus or emitted in the presence of certain stimuli with reward of the response during prior occurrence.
3. Referring to several classes of learning in the behavioristic branch of psychology.
[L. conditio, fr. condico, to agree]
Farlex Partner Medical Dictionary © Farlex 2012

condition

(kən-dĭsh′ən)
n.
1.
a. A mode or state of being: We bought a used boat in excellent condition.
b. conditions Existing circumstances: Economic conditions have improved. The news reported the latest weather conditions.
c. Archaic Social position; rank.
2.
a. A state of health: Has the patient's condition deteriorated?
b. A state of physical fitness: Have you exercised enough to get back into condition?
c. A disease or physical ailment: a heart condition.
3.
a. One that is indispensable to the appearance or occurrence of another; a prerequisite: Compatibility is a condition of a successful marriage.
b. One that restricts or modifies another; a qualification: I'll make you a promise but with one condition.
4.
a. Grammar The dependent clause of a conditional sentence; protasis.
b. Logic A proposition on which another proposition depends; the antecedent of a conditional proposition.
5. Law
a. A provision making the effect of a legal instrument contingent on the occurrence of an uncertain future event.
b. The event itself.
tr.v. condi·tioned, condi·tioning, condi·tions
1.
a. To make dependent on a condition or conditions: Use of the cabin is conditioned on your keeping it clean.
b. To stipulate as a condition: "He only conditioned that the marriage should not take place before his return" (Jane Austen).
2.
a. To cause to be in a certain condition; shape or influence: "Our modern conceptions of historiography [are] conditioned by Western intellectual traditions" (Carol Meyers).
b. To accustom (oneself or another) to something; adapt: had to condition herself to long hours of hard work; conditioned the troops to marches at high altitudes.
c. To render fit for work or use: spent weeks conditioning the old car.
d. To improve the physical fitness of (the body, for example), as through repeated sessions of strenuous physical activity.
e. Psychology To cause (an organism) to respond in a specific manner to a conditioned stimulus in the absence of an unconditioned stimulus.
3. To treat (the air in a room, for example) by air-conditioning.
4. To replace moisture or oils in (hair, for example) by use of a therapeutic product.
The American Heritage® Medical Dictionary Copyright © 2007, 2004 by Houghton Mifflin Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Company. All rights reserved.

condition

Medspeak
noun
(1) A patient’s current physical or mental status.
(2) A disease or illness.

Sports medicine
To undergo endurance training, see there.

Vox populi
noun A state, mode, or state of being; the physical status of the body as a whole or of one of its parts. Usually indicates abnormality.
verb To subject a person or organism to a set of circumstances that increase functionality.
Segen's Medical Dictionary. © 2012 Farlex, Inc. All rights reserved.

condition

noun A state, mode, or state of being; the physical status of the body as a whole or of one of its parts, usually indicates abnormality. See Medical condition, Permissive condition, Preexisting, condition Pregnancy-related conditions, Qualifying condition, Restrictive condition, Stress-related condition verb To subject a person or organism to a set of circumstances that ↑ functionality Sports medicine Endurance training, see there.
McGraw-Hill Concise Dictionary of Modern Medicine. © 2002 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.

con·di·tion

(kŏn-dish'ŭn)
1. To train; to undergo conditioning.
2. behavioral psychology A certain response elicited by a specifiable stimulus or emitted in the presence of certain stimuli with reward of the response during prior occurrence.
3. Referring to several classes of learning in the behavioristic branch of psychology.
[L. conditio, fr. condico, to agree]
Medical Dictionary for the Health Professions and Nursing © Farlex 2012

Patient discussion about condition

Q. What are the other conditions with the symptoms similar to fibromyalgia?

A. Other conditions with similar symptoms include polymyalgia rheumatica, myofascial pain syndrome, chronic fatigue syndrome, hypothyroidism, lupus, sarcoidosis and rheumatoid arthritis.

Q. On stopping the medicines his insomnia like condition starts hi all………………my dad is bipolar II and he was on lithium and clonazepam which had put his mania under control, but he sleeps a lot, as he finds his sleep refreshing him; which is due to medicine. On stopping the medicines his insomnia like condition starts and so now he takes his doses in excess to sleep…..we were told not to stop on these medicines……is it all right?

A. I agree with the others it is very dangerous to start and stop medications. One has to be weined off Lithium slowly. If your dad is finding that his current doses are not working properly he should be discussing it with his doctor whom will tweak his dosages or change his medications. It is so important to take medications as perscribed. Clonezepam can be addictive so it should be taken exactly as perscribed and monitored. There are other medications in the "pam" family that he can be changed to if the Clonezepam is no longer effective, rather than taking more.
The insomnia syptoms are signs of mania which will happen when he stops taking his medications. If you stop taking medications that are controlling bipolar symptoms the only logical outcome is the return of the bipolar symptoms. I would have him visit his doctor and discuss changing or increasing his doseages if he is finding they are not working effectivly anymore.

Q. What shall I include in my diet to cover the anemic condition and is anemia increases with pregnancy? Hi all. I am in my second week of pregnancy. I am anemic and prefer to have vegetarian diet. What shall I include in my diet to cover the anemic condition and is anemia increases with pregnancy?

A. Agree with Maverick's answer above..

Anemia in pregnancy is a very common problem, that's why during your antenatal care, usually your OB-GYn doctor or medical professional will give you iron tablet for supplements.

Unless your anemia is severe, it is unlikely to harm your baby. But iron deficiency has been linked to an increased risk of preterm birth and low birthweight. Anemia can also make you feel more tired than usual during your pregnancy.

You can help lower your risk of anemia by eating foods that contain iron during your entire pregnancy. These foods include:

Poultry (dark meat), Dried fruits (apricots, prunes, figs, raisins, dates), Iron-fortified cereals, breads and pastas, Oatmeal, Whole grains, Blackstrap molasses, Liver and other meats, Seafood, Spinach, broccoli, kale and other dark green leafy vegetables, Baked potato with skin, Beans and peas, Nuts and seeds, etc.

Also some fruit that rich in Vitamin C because vitamin C can increase the amount of iron yo

More discussions about condition
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References in periodicals archive ?
The fresh weight of bulb, dry weight of shoot and bulb significantly increased at all light conditions compared to dark conditions.
These findings complement an earlier placebo-controlled study showing that lutein/zeaxanthin supplementation improved visual performance under low light conditions. (5)
They also take account of the way the eye adapts to different light conditions.
In contrast, most cameras in challenging light conditions would either give dark, under-exposed images or they'd be very noisy, but the results won't turn out blurry.
It can also "switch seamlessly between 2D and 3D views" and allow for better pictures in low light conditions.
They also feature an optional ambient light sensing device to minimize current consumption during high ambient light conditions. Applications include mood lighting and daylight security camera lighting, spot lighting, flash lighting and under-counter lighting.
The solar battery requires just 60 lux to charge, and when used in low light conditions, it still works because that's when the capacitor kicks in.
The Short Magnum is 6.5x32 delivers a sharp, crisp image in all light conditions. The Short Magnum has a generous 420' field of view and the nearly 5mm pupil allows for maximum illumination of even the most obscure target.
High luminance of 400 cd/m?, high contrast of 600:1 and low levels of reflectivity on the screen surface enable a variety of information and pictures to be reproduced in clear and vivid color, even in high ambient light conditions.
Walter De Maria's sculptures, some embellished with gold leaf, are arrayed on a cascading grand staircase aligned east to west so that the character of the space changes under different light conditions. Finally, Monet's paintings are contained within a more conventional gallery, but hung in specially designed glass cases that repel the humid ocean atmosphere and the alkalinity of the concrete walls.
Biologists have theorized that the colors represent some fancy adaptation to changing light conditions, but Elfie Stocker-Worgotter of the University of Salzburg in Austria proposes a quite different explanation.