ligature


Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus, Encyclopedia, Wikipedia.

ligature

 [lig´ah-chur]
any material, such as a thread or wire, used in surgery to tie off blood vessels to prevent bleeding, or to treat abnormalities in other parts of the body by constricting the tissues; see also strangulation. Ligatures are used both inside and outside the body. If one must be left within the body after an operation, the type used will usually be of animal tissue or synthetic material that will dissolve or become incorporated in the patient's own body tissue. Those used on the outside of the body for stitches of cuts or incisions can be of any durable material and are removed after they have served their purpose. Special instruments have been developed for the application of ligatures to parts of the body that are difficult for the surgeon's hands to reach or to work in.

lig·a·ture

(lig'ă-chūr),
1. A thread, wire, fillet, or the like, tied tightly around a blood vessel, the pedicle of a tumor, or other structure to constrict it.
2. In orthodontics, a wire or other material used to secure an orthodontic attachment or tooth to an archwire.
[L. ligatura, a band or tie, fr. ligo, to tie]

ligature

(lĭg′ə-cho͝or′, -chər)
n.
1. The act of tying or binding.
2.
a. A cord, wire, or bandage used for tying or binding.
b. A thread, wire, or cord used in surgery to close vessels or tie off ducts.
c. Something that unites; a bond.
3. A character, letter, or unit of type, such as æ, combining two or more letters.
4. Music
a. A group of notes intended to be played or sung as one phrase.
b. A curved line indicating such a phrase; a slur.
c. A passage of notes sung by repeating the same syllable.
d. A metal band that attaches the reed to the mouthpiece of the clarinet and related instruments.
tr.v. liga·tured, liga·turing, liga·tures
To ligate.

ligature

Surgery
1. A material–silk, gut, wire, etc used to ligate.
2. A tissue plus the ligating material.

lig·a·ture

(lig'ă-chŭr)
1. A thread, wire, fillet, or the like, tied tightly around a blood vessel, the pedicle of a tumor, or other structure to constrict it.
2. orthodontics A wire or other material used to secure an orthodontic attachment or tooth to an archwire.

ligature

Any thread-like surgical material tied tightly round any structure. Ligatures are commonly made of absorbable material, such as catgut or collagen, but may be non-absorbable.

lig·a·ture

(lig'ă-chŭr)
1. In orthodontics, a wire or other material used to secure an orthodontic attachment or tooth to an archwire.
2. A thread, wire, fillet, or the like, tied tightly around a blood vessel or other structure to constrict it.
References in periodicals archive ?
The body has to be brought for medicolegal autopsy with the ligature material in situ.
For more information about these Ligature packages, contact Ligature Software, Burlington, MA, 617/238-6734.
Patrick Sharman, who was the unit ward manager at the time, described how the unit had been checked for potential ligature points in 2002.
Three types of elastomeric ligatures were assessed: a low-friction ligature, Super Slick[R] (TP Orthodontics, La Porte, USA), and two conventional ligatures, TP[R] (TP Orthodontics, La Porte, USA) and Unitek[R] (3M, Monrovia, USA), forming three experimental groups according to the type of ligature used, and a control group in which no tying between wire and bracket was used (Table 1).
(4) A wall hung lavatory like this one can accept a ligature tie horizontally, left to right across the top surface that butts into the wall.
Histopathologicla changes in skin and subcutaneous tissues at ligature site in cases of hanging and strangulation.
The presence of bodily injuries other than ligature mark should be given a consideration if they are severe and have a direct bearing with the ligature mark.
main concerns | A substantial number of potential ligature points, presenting a risk to detainees and the force.
A two-day inquest heard Linsay Bushell, who had emotionally unstable personality disorder, was found unconscious under her bed with a ligature around her neck in Broadoak Unit.
"In Dr Armour's opinion, Ellie-May's injuries show that she had been forcibly tied to the bed on more than one occasion," Tehrani added. "Other injuries indicate the attempts Ellie-May may have made to release the ligature on her left wrist.
Southwark senior coroner Andrew Harris said a postmortem finding of "ligature compression of the neckfits with circumstances the police have reported about this death".
Under 'provisional cause of death', the post-mortem report stated 'evidence of ligature mark over neck.'