ankylosis

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ankylosis

 [ang″kĭ-lo´sis] (pl. ankylo´ses) (Gr.)
immobility and consolidation of a joint due to disease, injury, or surgical procedure. adj., adj ankylot´ic. Ankylosis may be caused by destruction of the membranes that line the joint or by faulty bone structure. It is most often a result of chronic rheumatoid arthritis, in which the affected joint tends to assume the least painful position and may become more or less permanently fixed in it. Other causes include infection and traumatic injury to the joint. Artificial ankylosis (arthrodesis), fusion of a joint by surgical operation, is sometimes done to ameliorate the pain experienced in a severe joint condition.
bony ankylosis union of the bones of a joint by loss of articular cartilage, resulting in complete immobility.
extracapsular ankylosis that caused by rigidity of surrounding parts.
false ankylosis (fibrous ankylosis) reduced joint mobility due to proliferation of fibrous tissue.
intracapsular ankylosis that caused by rigidity of structures within the joint.
spurious ankylosis extracapsular ankylosis.
stapedial ankylosis fixation of the footplate of the stapes in otosclerosis, causing conductive hearing loss.
true ankylosis bony ankylosis.
Miller-Keane Encyclopedia and Dictionary of Medicine, Nursing, and Allied Health, Seventh Edition. © 2003 by Saunders, an imprint of Elsevier, Inc. All rights reserved.

an·ky·lo·sis

(ang'ki-lō'sis), Do not confuse this word with alkalosis.
Stiffening or fixation of a joint as the result of a disease process, with fibrous or bony union across the joint; fusion.
[G. ankylōsis, stiffening of a joint]
Farlex Partner Medical Dictionary © Farlex 2012

ankylosis

also

anchylosis

(ăng′kə-lō′sĭs)
n.
1. The consolidation of bones or their parts to form a single unit.
2. The stiffening and immobility of a joint as the result of disease, trauma, surgery, or abnormal bone fusion.

an′ky·lot′ic (-lŏt′ĭk) adj.
The American Heritage® Medical Dictionary Copyright © 2007, 2004 by Houghton Mifflin Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Company. All rights reserved.

ankylosis

Orthopedics A fusion of bones across a joint, which may be a complication of chronic inflammation. See Ankylosing spondylitis.
McGraw-Hill Concise Dictionary of Modern Medicine. © 2002 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.

an·ky·lo·sis

(ang'ki-lō'sis)
1. Stiffening or fixation of a joint as the result of a disease process, with fibrous or bony union across the joint.
2. dentistry Fusion of the tooth with the alveolar process.
[G. ankylōsis, stiffening of a joint]
Medical Dictionary for the Health Professions and Nursing © Farlex 2012

ankylosis

Fixation and immobilization of a joint by disease which has so damaged the bearing surfaces that the bone ends have been able to fuse permanently together. Sometimes ankylosis is deliberately performed, as a surgical procedure, to relieve pain. From the Greek ankylos , bent.
Collins Dictionary of Medicine © Robert M. Youngson 2004, 2005

ankylosis

stiffness or fixation of a joint caused by disease affecting the articulating surfaces.
Collins Dictionary of Biology, 3rd ed. © W. G. Hale, V. A. Saunders, J. P. Margham 2005

an·ky·lo·sis

(ang'ki-lō'sis)
Bony union of the radicular surface of a tooth to the surrounding alveolar bone in an area of previous partial root resorption.
[G. ankylōsis, stiffening of a joint]
Medical Dictionary for the Dental Professions © Farlex 2012

Patient discussion about ankylosis

Q. Is ankylosing spondylitis genetically inherited?

A. It is known today that ankylosing spondylitis (spondyloarthritis) has a very strong genetic connection. It is not a disease inhertited by a single gene that is dominant, but certainly there is genetic predisposition in families (and a more detailed information- about 90% of the patients express the HLA-B27 genotype).

Q. I have had ankylosing spondilitis for over 25 years. What is available at this point to mitigate the effects?

A. The mainstay of the treatment severe ankylosing spondylitis today are "anti-TNF", drugs that affect the immune system through blocking the action of a protein called TNF.

Other optional treatments include sulfasalazine and thalidomide.
Of course, all these treatments require prescription and consultation with a doctor (in this case usually rheumatologist).

You may read more here: http://www.nlm.nih.gov/medlineplus/ankylosingspondylitis.html

More discussions about ankylosis
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