lift

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lift

Sports medicine
noun The raising of an extremity.

Vox populi-UK
noun Elevator.

LIFT

Abbreviation for:
Late Intervention Following Thrombolysis
Local Improvement Finance Trust, see there

lift

(lift)
1. To raise or elevate.
2. The act of lifting.
3. A device for lifting.
[O.E., lypta]

lift

(lift)
1. To raise or elevate.
2. A material used to equalize the length of a shortened side of the body with the unshortened, normal, side, as on a shoe. Synonym: wedge (3)
References in periodicals archive ?
Murray contracted product management services leader Innovation Direct[TM] to represent Portable Toilet Seat Lifter to potential licensees for a 2 year period.
Last year, Egyptian Magad Salama resigned as national coach citing doping among senior lifters. "We re not giving up, we are definitely seeing an upswing," Gulati said.
The company says its lifters can be attached to a number of carriers such as excavators, wheel or track type loaders, cranes, pipelayers, forklifts as well as many others.
When a lifter pushes or pulls a barbell or dumbbell straight up while gravity acts straight down, the application of force is absolutely perfect.
Fleet Marines should start receiving the first of 156 new marinized heavy lifters, to be called the CH-53K, in 2015--which is none too soon for the program manager, Marine Col.
* Available in a variety of flow ratings for use with single or dual cart lifter systems
The coil lifter accommodates both vertical and horizontal lifting applications for steel coils weighing up to 125 pounds and plastic coils weighing up to 55 pounds.
A fellow weight lifter glanced at the Brit and remarked: "You realize, you're very, very strong and what you're doing is a sport." Morgan took the observation to heart.
reports that its VectorForm Lifter System doubles undercut capability in molds for plastic parts.
I am a nationally ranked power lifter who took steroids and lived in the steroid subculture from 1979 through 1985.1 know what a steroid body looks like, and they aren't in major league baseball.