lifestyle drug

(redirected from lifestyle drugs)
A prescription drug that allows its user to perform an activity ‘on demand’ or without consequences, ameliorate an imprudent binge, or modify effects of ageing

lifestyle drug

Popular health A prescription agent that allows its user to perform an activity 'on demand' or without consequences, ameliorate an imprudent binge, or modify effects of aging
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With required annual visits, more lifestyle drugs were prescribed for ailments such as arthritis and obesity (Loo 2015).
M2 PHARMA-March 28, 2017-Global Lifestyle Drugs Market to Grow at a CAGR of 2.
MOODY" vehicles, remote control cars and encrypted phones - this was the lifestyle drugs kingpin Ron Fitzgibbon pursued in a bid to evade cops.
Real-life cases explore aspects such as skin-lightening products, gambling advertising, lifestyle drugs, and sex tourism.
In the last two or three decades, we have seen the rise of lifestyle drugs, the best-selling ones being those for baldness and for erectile dysfunction.
The movement and purchase of lifestyle drugs and dietary supplements has become higher than ever.
The company raised debt between 2007 and 2010 to fund international expansion, setting up facilities and getting into newer categories such as lifestyle drugs was undertaken.
Wenger recently disclosed that one possible reason that Arsenal has been losing so many players is that they could be taking lifestyle drugs without the clubs knowledge.
of Minnesota, this volume analyzes advertisements for lifestyle drugs presented for disorders like depression, attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder, and sexual dysfunction.
He told Gulf News earlier that lifestyle drugs are more profitable to the companies.
Outlines the benefits and risks to healthcare consumers looking for self-medication, discreet medical consultation and prescriptions for medication to treat embarrassing conditions and chronic ailments as well as providing access to lifestyle drugs
and (3) Is there a correlation between the use of psychotropic lifestyle drugs (defined as widespread nonprescription psychotropic substances, see Table 2) and prescription or illegal neuroenhancers?