lifespan

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life·span

(līf'span),
1. The duration of life of an individual.
See also: longevity.
2. The normal or average duration of life of members of a given species.
See also: longevity.
Farlex Partner Medical Dictionary © Farlex 2012

lifespan

also

life span

(līf′spăn′)
n.
1. A lifetime.
2. The average or maximum length of time an organism, material, or object can be expected to survive or last.
The American Heritage® Medical Dictionary Copyright © 2007, 2004 by Houghton Mifflin Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Company. All rights reserved.

lifespan

Longevity Epidemiology The genetically endowed limit to life for a person, if free of exogenous risk factors. See Average lifespan, Life expectancy.
McGraw-Hill Concise Dictionary of Modern Medicine. © 2002 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.

lifespan

(līf′span″)
The time beginning with the birth of an organism to the time of its death.
Medical Dictionary, © 2009 Farlex and Partners
References in periodicals archive ?
The pancreas was a striking example of age mosaicism, i.e., a population of identical cells that are distinguished by their lifespans.
But the more time men spend physically active every day, the longer their lifespan, whereas the optimum amount for women was 60 minutes.
Scientists have long debated whether or not the ultimate lifespan in people has been attained.
[USA], December 8 ( ANI ): A team of researchers has recently discovered new genes linked to parents' lifespan, which can one day be targeted to help prolong human life.
One problem actuaries have is a limited supply of modern lifespan increase data.
It is not simply the fact that technologies possess lifespans, but the recognition that technology lifespans are increasingly shortened that impacts our day-to-day lives.
The finding seems to support theories that male sex hormones contribute to a shorter lifespan, three researchers from Inha University, Korea University and the National Institute of Korean History wrote in a paper published in the journal Current Biology.
However, the pinnacle of achievement - being captain - seemed to have no impact on lifespan.
It is quite possible Harriet is the world's oldest living creature and she's certainly lucked out in the lifespan stakes - some poor creatures count their time on earth in mere hours rather than years.
Scientists have launched Wales' first lifespan research centre to work out how best to plan for the future.
In discussing the risks inherent in extending human lifespan (September/October 2004), Michael L.