life-sustaining intervention

life-sustaining intervention

Any method, medicine, or device used to prolong life. Whether, when, and how to use life-sustaining treatments are difficult topics that require careful consideration by patients, their surrogates, and health care professionals.
See: advance directive; living will
References in periodicals archive ?
It is a life-sustaining intervention used in the later treatment of a patient with heart or lung failure.
Almost uniformly, hospital deaths are preceded by a decision to forego some form of life-sustaining intervention. If your heart is arrested, you are not dead unless CPR or extracorporeal life support is terminated or not initiated.
(153) The waiting period between the determination by the "ethics or medical committee" that the requested life-sustaining intervention is medically inappropriate and the time that the health cate institution is no longer obligated to provide the treatment has been a major source of the conflict regarding the policy.
The American Thoracic Society (15) seems to have embraced such a conclusion, declaring that treatment should be considered futile 'if reasoning and experience indicate that the intervention would be highly unlikely to result in a meaningful survival for the patient', and asserts that a 'health care institution has the right to limit a life-sustaining intervention without consent'.
According to deBlois, most of the ethical dilemmas that arise in health care settings involve end-of-life issues like whether to begin or withhold life-sustaining intervention, such as use of mechanical ventilators, or questions about donation of organs for transplant.
Should patients and their families have access to any life-sustaining intervention they choose?
Lo's original concern was to address decisions regarding life-sustaining interventions, but soon realized that physicians need help with many ethical issues regarding such matters as impaired colleagues, patient requests to deceive insurance companies, and ethical problems in managed care.
The letter written by AMA President Jeremy Lazarus stated, "Every competent patient has the right to refuse medical intervention, including life-sustaining interventions."
MEDICAL TECHNOLOGY has gotten so effective at prolonging human life that it's often difficult for people--both patients and doctors--to know when it's time to stop pursuing life-sustaining interventions. In Extreme Measures: Finding a Better Path to the End of Life, palliative care physician Jessica Nutik Zitter suggests ways to change the culture of medicine and empower patients so that they can avoid overly mechanized and painful deaths.
He understands that the primary team recommended ongoing but temporary use of life-sustaining interventions, anticipating that he would recover from his acute medical conditions.
Decisions related to the initiation, continuation, and termination of life-sustaining interventions rely heavily on outcome predictions, which are of uncertain reliability at best (Oberle & Hughes, 2001).
After the decision to admit a patient to the ICU, life-sustaining interventions are begun.