life stress

life stress

events or experiences that produce severe strain, for example, failure on the job, marital separation, loss of a love object.

life stress

(līf stres)
Events or experiences that produce severe strain, e.g., job loss, marital separation, loss of a love one, financial collapse.

life stress

(līf stres)
Events or experiences that produce severe strain, e.g., job loss.
References in periodicals archive ?
Life Stress, Spirituality, and Affective Well-being
Life stress sources and symptoms of collegiate student athletic trainers over the course of an academic year.
The influence of genetic factors and life stress on depression among adolescent girls.
However, starting in middle age, these so-called "graduates" of early life stress began to forget the location of objects they had seen before.
In this chapter Boll and his colleagues argue that the clinical evidence they have reviewed strongly suggests that there is a key interactive relationship between psychosocial factors such as life stress, depression, coping styles, and social support, and the progression and mortality rates of various forms of cancer.
These are complex relationships to be sure, regardless of whether they involve our exposure to a weather change or infectious agent ("bug") or reflect our succumbing to the pressures of work, relationship, or other life stress. Very often, we are unaware of this process of imbalance (in a large sense why we got sick to begin with).
The prevalence of calcification was similar in the 13% with depression, anxiety hostility, or significant life stress and in those without such disorders.
In a paper published before this study, researchers found a correlation between high life stress and low social support; a study conducted by Dr.
Over the past two decades, life stress has been studied in relation to a host of social, psychological, and medical outcomes, including injuries (Hamilton et al., 1989, Passer & Seese, 1983; Petrie, 1992; Schroeder & Costa, 1984; Smith, Smoll, & Ptacek, 1990; Zautra, Guarnacchia, Reich, & Dohrenwend, 1988).
Birnbaum, "Putting the Life Back Into `Life Events:' Toward a Cognitive Social Learning Analysis of the Coping Process," in Handbook of Life Stress, Cognition and Health, eds., S.
Some scientists believe paranoia may be a reaction to high levels of life stress. Lending support to this opinion is the evidence that paranoia is more prevalent among immigrants, prisoners of war, and others undergoing severe stress.
The present study extends work on predictors of dentists' stress to examine the role of multiple dimensions of dentists' perceptions of their work in affecting their levels of occupational stress, general life stress and mental health.