lie scale

lie scale

in psychometrics, items included within a test or questionnaire designed to detect whether respondents have responded truthfully to the items the test is designed to tap. An example would be an item that everybody would be expected to endorse if responding truthfully (e.g. 'I sometimes get upset'). If an individual did not endorse this item it would be assumed that they are not responding truthfully.
References in periodicals archive ?
The test subjects were also asked to fill in a psychological survey called a lie scale to help the team gauge their perceived and actual honesty levels which helped rank the test group.
1985a) contains 48 items (each scored yes/no) grouped into four subscales which measure the three primary personality domains of psychoticism, extraversion, and neuroticism, as well as a lie scale which assesses the chance of making socially desirable responses.
The Lie scale is intended to evaluate concealment of anxiety through social desirability factors which are considered problematic for older adult populations (Reynolds et al.
Duris, Bjorck, and Gorsuch (2007) directly explored, across two studies, MMPI-2 Lie scale elevations within Christian samples.
The measure also contains a lie scale to assess an individual's willingness to conform.
Here we examine the Eysenck Personality Questionnaire-Junior, which includes the traits of neuroticism, extraversion, and psychoticism, and a lie scale (Eysenck & Eysenck, 1985).
The items of the lie scale can totalize 25 points while the other 15 assertions cannot exceed 15 points.
Anyone who ticks the 'True' box by such an item only increases his or her score on the Lie Scale because no one can be that saintly.