lie detector

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detector

 [de-tek´ter]
a device by which an object or condition can be discovered.
image detector any recording medium used in radiology, such as film or a cathode ray tube.
lie detector polygraph.

pol·y·graph

(pol'ē-graf),
1. An instrument to obtain simultaneous tracings from several different sources; for example, radial and jugular pulse, apex beat of the heart, phonocardiogram, electrocardiogram. The ECG is nearly always included for timing.
2. An instrument for recording changes in respiration, blood pressure, galvanic skin response, and other physiologic changes while the person is questioned about some matter or asked to give associations to relevant and irrelevant words; these physiologic changes are presumed to be indicators of emotional reactions, and thus whether the person is telling the truth. Synonym(s): lie detector
[poly- + G. graphō, to write]

lie detector

Etymology: AS, leogan, untruth; L, detegere, to uncover
an electronic device or instrument used to detect lying or anxiety in regard to specific questions. A commonly used lie detector is the polygraph recorder that senses and records pulse, respiratory rate, blood pressure, and perspiration. Some experts hold that certain patterns indicate the presence of anxiety, guilt, or fear-emotions that are likely to occur when the subject is lying.
Commonly called a lie detector. An instrument that measures and records a test subject’s sympathetic nervous system responses—pulse, blood pressure, galvanic skin conductance due to sweating, breathing rhythms, and temperature—to a series of questions, on the premise that true and false answers produce distinctive patterns of response.

lie detector

Psychology A device that detects chest and abdominal movement during respiration, heart rate, BP, and galvanic skin conductance due to sweating. See Polygraph test.

pol·y·graph

(pol'ē-graf)
1. An instrument for obtaining simultaneous tracings from several different sources (e.g., radial and jugular pulse, apex beat of the heart, phonocardiogram, electrocardiogram). The electrocardiogram is nearly always included for timing.
2. An instrument for recording changes in respiration, blood pressure, galvanic skin response, and other physiologic changes while the subject is interviewed or asked to give associations to relevant and irrelevant words; the physiologic changes are presumed to be emotional reactions, and thus indicative of whether the subject is telling the truth.
Synonym(s): lie detector.
[poly- + G. graphō, to write]

lie detector

A popular terms for the polygraph—a collection of devices used to monitor and record various parameters of the body, such as the pulse rate, the blood pressure, the evenness and rate of breathing and the moistness, and hence the electrical resistance, of the skin. These vary with the state of the emotions and the results can be thought to cast light on significance to the subject of certain questions or statements. Emotional responses do not, however, necessarily indicate that the subject is lying or concealing the truth. Lie detection is a function of the interpreter, not the machine and it is the sensitivity, intelligence, imagination and experience of the operator that determines the forensic value of the procedure. This should always be challenged if lie detector evidence is used in court.
References in periodicals archive ?
An investigation is under way but Mr Davies said that he would submit to a lie detector test and called upon MP Angela Eagle or those who had made the allegations to also take one.
Furious and humiliated, San Francisco police vowed never to employ the lie detector again; at the next meeting of the International Association of Chiefs of Police, their captain declared that future use of the polygraph could not be countenanced.
Employers know that the truth is usually mitigated by common sense, which is why they might see lie detector tests as useful.
The Northumbria Probation Service is one of 10 across the country involved in testing the use of lie detectors on sex offenders.
And not only that: He also wants the NRC to "line up" the witnesses who have given evidence against him to be subjected to similar lie detector tests, in addition to his own evidence being televised live by "the world's most renowned wire news networks".
In May, the Philadelphia Police Department stopped using lie detectors to screen applicants, on the grounds that too many qualified candidates were being disqualified by unreliable polygraph scores.
They were later questioned using the lie detector to see if they had been on the look out for victims or come into contact with any of their other triggers.
The senior security source who confirmed that MI5 officers were checking on the latest lie detector techniques said: "I don't think the question of polygraphs is a dead question, I think it's an open question.
Without disputing the need of businesses and agencies to safeguard against theft, unproductivity, sloth, fraud, or other misconduct, the following four questions about these latter-day lie detectors can be raised.
First, where an employer simply wishes to determine if anything is missing or has been stolen, the use of lie detectors is prohibited.
CRIMINALS seeking to clear their names often turn to lie detectors.