lie detector

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detector

 [de-tek´ter]
a device by which an object or condition can be discovered.
image detector any recording medium used in radiology, such as film or a cathode ray tube.
lie detector polygraph.

pol·y·graph

(pol'ē-graf),
1. An instrument to obtain simultaneous tracings from several different sources; for example, radial and jugular pulse, apex beat of the heart, phonocardiogram, electrocardiogram. The ECG is nearly always included for timing.
2. An instrument for recording changes in respiration, blood pressure, galvanic skin response, and other physiologic changes while the person is questioned about some matter or asked to give associations to relevant and irrelevant words; these physiologic changes are presumed to be indicators of emotional reactions, and thus whether the person is telling the truth. Synonym(s): lie detector
[poly- + G. graphō, to write]
Commonly called a lie detector. An instrument that measures and records a test subject’s sympathetic nervous system responses—pulse, blood pressure, galvanic skin conductance due to sweating, breathing rhythms, and temperature—to a series of questions, on the premise that true and false answers produce distinctive patterns of response.

lie detector

Psychology A device that detects chest and abdominal movement during respiration, heart rate, BP, and galvanic skin conductance due to sweating. See Polygraph test.

pol·y·graph

(pol'ē-graf)
1. An instrument for obtaining simultaneous tracings from several different sources (e.g., radial and jugular pulse, apex beat of the heart, phonocardiogram, electrocardiogram). The electrocardiogram is nearly always included for timing.
2. An instrument for recording changes in respiration, blood pressure, galvanic skin response, and other physiologic changes while the subject is interviewed or asked to give associations to relevant and irrelevant words; the physiologic changes are presumed to be emotional reactions, and thus indicative of whether the subject is telling the truth.
Synonym(s): lie detector.
[poly- + G. graphō, to write]

lie detector

A popular terms for the polygraph—a collection of devices used to monitor and record various parameters of the body, such as the pulse rate, the blood pressure, the evenness and rate of breathing and the moistness, and hence the electrical resistance, of the skin. These vary with the state of the emotions and the results can be thought to cast light on significance to the subject of certain questions or statements. Emotional responses do not, however, necessarily indicate that the subject is lying or concealing the truth. Lie detection is a function of the interpreter, not the machine and it is the sensitivity, intelligence, imagination and experience of the operator that determines the forensic value of the procedure. This should always be challenged if lie detector evidence is used in court.
References in periodicals archive ?
A EVEN if it was possible - ZA which it isn't - a lie detector test wouldn't solve anything.
The theory of the lie detector is that lying causes stress and this shows as an increase in heart rate, erratic breathing, increased sweating and heightened nerve activity.
"A lie detector test can't actually show whether someone is lying.
Lie detector evidence is not admissible in British courts.
Defending its use, Angela said that the lie detector is "57 episodes into the run," and is "one episode, one element, it's not even a big deal in terms of the format of the show."
Kavanaugh wrote the unanimous opinion for the three-judge panel of the United States Court of Appeals in Washington, D.C., finding that the Defense Department could withhold reports about whether lie detector tests were effective under the federal public records law.
THE owner of a leading lie detector company has offered to carry out tests to resolve a dispute within a Merseyside Labour party.
The questions were devised by world-renowned tester Ben Bladok, the US-based expert who is seen as the Godfather of lie detector tests.
The truth machine; a social history of the lie detector.
Now lie detectors are by no means perfect but they could actually help the innocent clear their names.
Jambos owner Vladimir Romanov recently caused a stir by claiming the club used lie detectors to flush out "suspicious people".