lie detector


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detector

 [de-tek´ter]
a device by which an object or condition can be discovered.
image detector any recording medium used in radiology, such as film or a cathode ray tube.
lie detector polygraph.

pol·y·graph

(pol'ē-graf),
1. An instrument to obtain simultaneous tracings from several different sources; for example, radial and jugular pulse, apex beat of the heart, phonocardiogram, electrocardiogram. The ECG is nearly always included for timing.
2. An instrument for recording changes in respiration, blood pressure, galvanic skin response, and other physiologic changes while the person is questioned about some matter or asked to give associations to relevant and irrelevant words; these physiologic changes are presumed to be indicators of emotional reactions, and thus whether the person is telling the truth. Synonym(s): lie detector
[poly- + G. graphō, to write]

lie detector

Etymology: AS, leogan, untruth; L, detegere, to uncover
an electronic device or instrument used to detect lying or anxiety in regard to specific questions. A commonly used lie detector is the polygraph recorder that senses and records pulse, respiratory rate, blood pressure, and perspiration. Some experts hold that certain patterns indicate the presence of anxiety, guilt, or fear-emotions that are likely to occur when the subject is lying.
Commonly called a lie detector. An instrument that measures and records a test subject’s sympathetic nervous system responses—pulse, blood pressure, galvanic skin conductance due to sweating, breathing rhythms, and temperature—to a series of questions, on the premise that true and false answers produce distinctive patterns of response.

lie detector

Psychology A device that detects chest and abdominal movement during respiration, heart rate, BP, and galvanic skin conductance due to sweating. See Polygraph test.

pol·y·graph

(pol'ē-graf)
1. An instrument for obtaining simultaneous tracings from several different sources (e.g., radial and jugular pulse, apex beat of the heart, phonocardiogram, electrocardiogram). The electrocardiogram is nearly always included for timing.
2. An instrument for recording changes in respiration, blood pressure, galvanic skin response, and other physiologic changes while the subject is interviewed or asked to give associations to relevant and irrelevant words; the physiologic changes are presumed to be emotional reactions, and thus indicative of whether the subject is telling the truth.
Synonym(s): lie detector.
[poly- + G. graphō, to write]

lie detector

A popular terms for the polygraph—a collection of devices used to monitor and record various parameters of the body, such as the pulse rate, the blood pressure, the evenness and rate of breathing and the moistness, and hence the electrical resistance, of the skin. These vary with the state of the emotions and the results can be thought to cast light on significance to the subject of certain questions or statements. Emotional responses do not, however, necessarily indicate that the subject is lying or concealing the truth. Lie detection is a function of the interpreter, not the machine and it is the sensitivity, intelligence, imagination and experience of the operator that determines the forensic value of the procedure. This should always be challenged if lie detector evidence is used in court.
References in periodicals archive ?
But now the relationship is on the rocks - with both denying any infidelity - after they took lie detector tests while recording the ITV show 10 days ago.
Federal agencies report a similar failure rate: According to a 1997 letter submitted to the Senate Judiciary Committee by Donald Kerr, then assistant director of the FBI's Laboratory Division, 20 percent of the bureau's job applicants were "determined to be withholding pertinent information" on lie detector tests and were denied federal employment.
However, a source close to the Wallasey MP said they stood by the claims and dismissed the suggestion of a lie detector test, saying "polygraph tests are only extensively used in Britain on the Jeremy Kyle Show".
Back in 2003, women went from having fewer sexual partners than men (when not hooked up to a lie detector) to being essentially even to men (when hooked up to the lie detector.
However, the two Zee editors, Samir Ahluwalia and Sudhir Chaudhary, who are behind bars in connection with the case, declined to undergo the lie detector test but agreed to give their voice samples to the investigators.
Suspicion "Yesterday we threw ideas around and the lie detector test came from me.
Taking a lie detector or polygraph is pointless - if it clears you she will probably question its accuracy and if it gives the wrong result you are damned in her eyes.
Voice recognition equipment, the so-called lie detector tests used by councils and the Government to uncover fraudulent benefit claimants, could just as easily be used by company HR departments, it is being suggested.
MANY will be doubtful at what amounts to a lie detector being used when calls are made on housing benefit claimants.
As the process plays out, five bachelorettes and five bachelors will be scrutinized and attached to a lie detector before two winners are attached to each other.
The lawyer for Marion Jones has challenged the man who alleged he supplied the former Olympic sprint champion with performance-enhancing drugs to take a lie detector test.