lidocaine


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lidocaine

 [li´do-kān]
an anesthetic with sedative, analgesic, and cardiac depressant properties, applied topically in the form of the base or hydrochloride salt as a local anesthetic; also used in the latter form to treat cardiac arrhythmias and to produce infiltration anesthesia and various nerve blocks.

lidocaine

/li·do·caine/ (li´do-kān) an anesthetic with sedative, analgesic, and cardiac depressant properties, applied topically in the form of the base or hydrochloride salt as a local anesthetic; also used in the latter form as a cardiac antiarrhythmic and to produce infiltration anesthesia and various nerve blocks.

lidocaine

(lī′də-kān′)
n.
A synthetic amide, C14H22N2O, used chiefly in the form of its hydrochloride as a local anesthetic and antiarrhythmic agent.

lidocaine

Ambulatory surgery An anesthetic used for topical and dental anesthesia, cardiac arrhythmias

lidocaine

LIGNOCAINE or Xylocaine. The drug is on the WHO official list.

lidocaine

a local anesthetic used as a cardiac antiarrhythmic and to produce infiltration anesthesia and epidural and peripheral nerve blocks. Called also lignocaine.
References in periodicals archive ?
Consequently, in cases of infiltration with large volumes of lidocaine, our recommendation is that the procedure must be performed under the constant supervision of an anaesthetist who must be prepared to manage lidocaine toxicity-related cardiac arrest.
If the tourniquet malfunctions and deflates during the case, the patient may have a seizure due to lidocaine toxicity.
In patients with refractory TdP, lidocaine treatment can be considered, and amiodarone should be avoided.
The present study compared the electrocardiographic effects of lidocaine, lidocaine with epinephrine and prilocaine with octapressin in the same high risk sedated cardiac patient according to the National Cholesterol Education Programme, Adult Treatment Panel III (NCEP ATP 3) guidelines and low risk according to European Society of Cardiology ESC) guidelines during oral surgery under local anesthesia.
Randomized trials of the 2% lidocaine versus plain lubricating gel in men undergoing flexible cystoscopy report mixed findings (Birch et al.
This novel formulation also achieved the maximum absorption rate of lidocaine through penile stratum corneum (skin's outer layer), and thus attained maximum anesthetic effect, but retained great sensory feeling.
Recent reports suggest that there is no difference in the incidence of paraesthesia following IANB using lidocaine or articaine [Mikesell et al.
Possible side effects Side effects from using lidocaine patches are rare and tend to manifest as reactions at the application site, such as redness, swelling, irritation and peeling.
The medical reports from the two hospitals where the children were admitted confirmed that they were not given LidocaineEoACA* who gave them Lidocaine.
Study done by Van Elstraete et al added Neostigmine to lidocaine in axillary plexus block for postoperative analgesia.