licensure


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licensure

 [li´sen-shur]
the granting of a permit to perform acts which, without it, would be illegal. The licensure of health care personnel traditionally has been the responsibility of the state licensing boards, governed by licensing statutes enacted by the state.
individual licensure the granting of a legal permit that is personal and cannot be transferred to another. The individual seeking the licensure must meet standards for practice as established by the state licensing statutes. In most instances the initial license is granted upon successful completion of an examination administered by the state examining board of the specific profession or vocation, and annual re-registration is required to maintain the license.
institutional licensure licensure of an agency providing a particular service to the public. In the health field the licensure of health care agencies, such as hospitals and clinics, has been common practice for many years.
Miller-Keane Encyclopedia and Dictionary of Medicine, Nursing, and Allied Health, Seventh Edition. © 2003 by Saunders, an imprint of Elsevier, Inc. All rights reserved.

licensure

The public or governmental regulation of health or other professions for voluntary private-sector programs that attest to the competency of an individual health care practitioner. See License. Cf Certification.
McGraw-Hill Concise Dictionary of Modern Medicine. © 2002 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.

li·cen·sure

(līsĕn-shŭr)
Permission granted to a professional to practice within a jurisdiction.
[L. licentia, fr. licet, it is permitted, + -ure, noun suffix]
Medical Dictionary for the Dental Professions © Farlex 2012
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The pool of candidates working toward architecture licensure is more diverse than ever before, and 36 percent of newly licensed architects are women.

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