lice


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Related to lice: head lice, Body lice

lice

 [līs]
plural of louse.
Miller-Keane Encyclopedia and Dictionary of Medicine, Nursing, and Allied Health, Seventh Edition. © 2003 by Saunders, an imprint of Elsevier, Inc. All rights reserved.

lice

(līs),
Plural of louse.

lice

pediculophobia, phthiriophobia.
Farlex Partner Medical Dictionary © Farlex 2012

lice

(līs)
n.
Plural of louse.
The American Heritage® Medical Dictionary Copyright © 2007, 2004 by Houghton Mifflin Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Company. All rights reserved.
A flat wingless parasitic insect, that may be a carrier of pathogens; its plural is lice
Segen's Medical Dictionary. © 2012 Farlex, Inc. All rights reserved.

lice

(līs)
Plural of louse.
Medical Dictionary for the Health Professions and Nursing © Farlex 2012

lice

Small, wingless, insect parasites of humans. There are three kinds of human lice-the head louse, Pediculus humanus capitis , that lives on the scalp and feeds by sucking blood, the body louse, Pediculus humanus corporis , that lives in the seams of clothing close to the skin and move on to the body only to feed, and the crab louse, Phthirius pubis , that infests the pubic hair and, occasionally, the chest hair, armpit hair or eyebrows. Phthirius pubis is usually transmitted by sexual contact. Body lice transmit epidemic TYPHUS and RELAPSING FEVER.
Collins Dictionary of Medicine © Robert M. Youngson 2004, 2005
References in periodicals archive ?
Nymphs are smaller and become adult lice one to two weeks after they hatch.
* An infestation occurs when live lice get into the hair and lay eggs on the hair follicles.
caused when children scratch their head with dirty fingernails or if faecal matter from the lice gets into a scratch.
Dana Balchunas, Washoe's director of student health services, says the districts lice policy has "caught people's attention every year," largely because many people still mistakenly believe that lice are harmful and easily spread in school settings.
You don't this fancy peek "A study by Hedrin found 87% of parents feel worry, panic or stress when they discover lice in their child's hair, but I would reassure parents that head lice are a common part of childhood and are easy to eliminate using the correct treatments.
Lice-Nil is an oil-based formula (neem, tea tree and coconut) that kills 100% of lice and their nits.
Genetic mutation of lice across many states in the US has led to the insects developing resistance to over-the-counter treatments.
Official health advice is that if you spot head lice, there's no need to stay off work or school or wash clothing and laundry on a hot wash, as this is unlikely to be useful.
If you're reticent about using chemical treatments, many people report success from slathering their hair in conditioner and using a nit comb to tease out the lice. Wipe the comb on a paper towel after each pass through your hair.
Facing a head lice infestation can be downright traumatizing, especially for parents.
A combination of conditions, including poor clothing hygiene, lack of resources, and cold weather, put certain human populations, such as homeless persons, more at risk of harboring lice and for louseborne diseases (2).
The irony is that I am a biologist who has given lectures on lice. I should have known better.