libido

(redirected from libidinal)
Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus, Encyclopedia.
Related to libidinal: libidinal energy, libidinal development

libido

 [lĭ-be´do, lĭ-bi´do] (L.)
1. sexual desire.
2. the psychic energy derived from instinctive biological drives; in early freudian theory it was restricted to the sexual drive, then expanded to include all expressions of love and pleasure, but the concept has evolved to include also the death instinct. freud postulated that libido development occurs in distinct stages: the oral stage, anal stage, and genital stage. Mental illnesses are therefore considered disturbances of libido development, such as regression to an earlier phase. jung proposed that although libido can be viewed according to the freudian pattern, it can also be desexualized and viewed as an undifferentiated energy that is at the basis of such mental processes as thinking, feeling, sensation, and intuition. adj., adj libid´inal.

li·bi·do

(li-bē'dō, -bī'dō), Do not confuse this word with livedo.
1. Conscious or unconscious sexual desire.
2. Any passionate interest or form of life force.
3. In jungian psychology, synonymous with psychic energy.
[L. lust]

libido

/li·bi·do/ (lĭ-be´do) (lĭ-bi´do) pl. libid´ines   [L.]
1. sexual desire.
2. the psychic energy derived from instinctive biological drives; in early freudian theory it was restricted to the sexual drive, then expanded to all expressions of love and pleasure, but has evolved to include also the death instinct.libid´inal

libido

(lĭ-bē′dō, -bī′-)
n. pl. libi·dos
1. The psychic and emotional energy associated with instinctual biological drives.
2.
a. Sexual desire.
b. Manifestation of the sexual drive.

li·bid′i·nal (-bĭd′n-əl) adj.
li·bid′i·nal·ly adv.

libido

[libē′dō, libī′dō]
1 the psychic energy or instinctual drive associated with sexual desire, pleasure, or creativity.
2 (in psychoanalysis) the instinctual drives of the id.
3 lustful desire or striving. libidinal, libidinous, adj. libidinize, v.

libido

Sigmund Freud’s term for one’s sex drive or sexual desire.

libido

plural, libidos, sex drive Psychiatry Sexual drive, urge or desire; the psychic and emotional energy associated with instinctive biologic drives, generally equated to sexual drive; normal libido requires adequate testosterone and dopamine–which inhibits libido-attenuating prolactin. See Anorgasmia.

li·bi·do

(li-bē'dō)
1. Conscious or unconscious sexual desire.
2. Any passionate interest or form of life force.
3. In jungian psychology, synonymous with psychic energy.
[L. lust]

libido

Sexual desire or its manifestations. In psychoanalytic theory, the term is used more generally to mean the psychic and emotional energy associated with instinctual biological drives.

libido

pl. libidines [L.] sexual drive, vigor, enthusiasm.

absent libido
unwillingness to copulate on the part of a male.

Patient discussion about libido

Q. What are some ways to get an erection? Libido and sperm are OK. I have had a problem with depression for years. I have always had a strong libido and I find that my ED has been a factor in my depression. Sexual relationships have helped me deal with my depression. What a MIRACLE! How can something so good be a remedy for mental problems. Oh! for a good stiff dick. I have considered a penile prosthesis implant but I'm still hoping for something better. Any information that might help would be greatly appreciated and I will remember you in my dreams and fantasies(sexual)for you ladies and I'll thank you studs. John

A. I am a female but my husband likes to think about a womans vagina. So maybe you should get a fake vagina try Adameve.com. And also try lubricants and other things, think about what turns you on.

More discussions about libido
References in periodicals archive ?
For the male child this means detaching his libidinal wishes from his mother and choosing another love-object.
Among the topics are if horses had hands, post-meateating, rat feeding experiments in early vitamin research, animals and the Renaissance anatomies of human exceptionalism, fellow-feeling with chickens, and human-nonhuman libidinal relations.
Nesnelerden cekilen libidinal enerji, bedene yatirilmakta ve beden iliski kurulabilen tek nesne olarak varligini surdurmektedir.
The third position introduced by Freud at once derepresses the existence of childhood sexuality and emphasizes the importance of aim-inhibited libidinal ties, especially during the "return" of sexuality in early adolescence.
The inner feminine figure to which he has a primary libidinal phallo-umbilical attachment in his un/conscious is none of his wives, or--at least overtly--his internal mother who in every other way is his overt bodily flesh identity.
Charmed by DeMarco's libidinal swagger, Mickler lets himself be swept into identifying with his young patient, a process that arouses the good doctor from his torpor.
TV characters somehow routinely prove to be far more mindlessly libidinal than your average human being.
Donna Summer was singing "Love to Love You Baby," and her libidinal coos braided with the breaking surf and the gritty, breeze coming in off the lake.
For though Hedges's first imposing gaze upon Lutie can be read as a sexual act, Hedges's gaze here and later is generally characterized in terms that are more systematic than libidinal.
This interpretation reveals a libidinal economy informed by a non-biological paternity: paternity is established by a husband's legal right over his wife's body, and this bond is stronger than any genetic connection.
As Neuhaus noted later in his essay on Bawer's book, "Our culture is largely dominated by the imperative of being `free to be me' -- with `me' being defined by our strongest libidinal urgencies.
The possibility it offers of displacing a large amount of libidinal components, whether narcissistic, aggressive or even erotic, on to professional work and on to the human relations connected with it lends it a value by no means second to what it enjoys as something indispensable to the preservation and justification of existence in society.