liberty cap


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liberty cap

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26) It is important that the Dutch version of the liberty cap is neither the helmet-shaped Roman pileus, nor the drooping Phrygian cap, but the wide-brimmed hat of the Netherlandish gentry.
28) It is likely that William brought the Dutch political context and a specifically seditious meaning for the pike and liberty cap to England when he landed at Torbay.
What is clearly a liberty tree topped with a liberty cap stands in the American corner.
The liberty cap on a pole, the broken shackles of the Bastille, the balance, the Masonic eye, all ominously encircle the monarch.
In a study devoted to the French liberty cap, Jennifer Harris has noted that to date precisely the emergence of the bonnet rouge would be a difficult task.
82) Given this flurry of activity associated with the bonnet rouge, it seems likely that the origins of a specifically Parisian habitus for the liberty cap lie in these months.
110) With caution, we might suggest that in the absence of a tree, a king's body, itself an emblem of power, could serve just as well as a hanging-post for the liberty cap.
It was a long time after Brutus had celebrated the death of Caesar with a liberty cap on a spear when Charles Davis was able to incite a riot in Bristol in 1831 by placing his hat on the end of his umbrella.
28 For examples of the liberty cap in British images referring to "Liberty of Conscience" immediately prior to 1688, see F.
John Brewer has suggested to me that during the Glorious Revolution the liberty cap was generally known in England as the "Dutch liberty cap".
21) So, like the maypoles of Varagnac's folklore adorned with the outillage of the dead and the maypoles of insurrection dressed with the seigneur's tools, liberty trees too were decorated with liberty caps, tricolour ribbons, flowers and, occasionally, farm implements.
It is possible that in America this learned tradition may have coincided with certain urban rituals of insurrection employing trees, maypoles and liberty caps, American counterparts to those French rituals of rebellion in Perigord and Quercy.