liberation

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Related to liberationist: resubmit, call on

liberation

[lib′ərā′shən]
Etymology: L, liber, free
the process of drug release from the dosage form.

liberation

Therapeutics The release and dissolution of a drug from its dosage form
References in periodicals archive ?
The dominance of gay print media in Australia--be it liberationist or male nude in the 1970s, gay lifestyle in the 1980s, or separate lesbian publications and free city-based newspapers in the 1990s--started to decline with the arrival of the internet, and this development coincided in notable ways with the declining popularity of gay bars.
Vera brings women and their concerns to the centre of her narratives, contesting their marginalization and erasure from the patriarchal grand narratives of Zimbabwean liberationist history while at the same time examining the continual violence and social dislocation within her society.
Local liberationist groups, like those in Indianapolis and Bloomington, provided a starting point for statewide organizations like NOW and WPC by offering a ready forum for feminist discussion and welcomed liberal women interested in statewide coordination to their events.
Of the six formulations he attempts, only one he thinks liberationists should reject, namely, that any and all human interests trump any and all animal interests solely on the basis that those human interests belong to humans.
In fact, where has the middle class learned about the blessings of liberationist ideals?
By this standard he determined whether black religious ideas and institutions adhered to their liberationist mandate.
By the end of the decade, the liberationist rhetoric had waned, superseded by a so-called 'ethnic minority' approach and portraying gays and lesbians as an identifiable group similar in legitimacy and distinctiveness to other so-called minority communities in the city and possessing a legitimate urban territory (Nash 2005).
To my mind, these developments are a measure of how far the insights of the 1960s went, and how live a nerve the liberationist movements have struck.
While it offers more evidence that the region is in the grip of a liberationist pop culture frenzy (see "Look Who's Rocking the Casbah," June), it also demonstrates that even the region's pop fandom can fall prey to conspiracy theories and divisiveness.
But as Berry realizes, the doctrine of the autonomous self is in the ascendant, and not only among "certain liberationist intellectuals" and other elites.
He insists that he still is concerned here to explore "the influences that gay liberationist men and lesbian feminists had upon one another" and that he wishes to "resist the tendency to see separation as a sign of isolation" (p.