libel

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Related to libels: slander, defaming

libel

(lī′bĕl) [L. libellus, little book, pamphlet]
Defaming the character of another by means of the written word. To qualify legally as libel, written communication must intentionally impugn the reputation of another person and be both malicious and demonstrably false.
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This July, conservative super-donor Charles Koch complained to a crowd of donors that rumors he would support Hillary Clinton amounted to a "blood libel." Last April, former Israeli ambassador and current member of Knesset Michael Oren denounced Democratic primary contender Bernie Sanders in The Times of Israel for overstating the number of Palestinian casualties in the Gaza War of 2014; Oren called that overstatement a "blood libel," too.
Dina Porat and Haim Hillel Ben-Sasson, writing in the Encyclopedia Judaica, call the blood libel "one of the most terrible expressions of the combination of human cruelty and credulity." Although the first instance of the classic blood libel was leveled in 1144 at the Jews of Norwich, England who were falsely said to have kidnapped, tortured and hanged a child named William--elements of it stretch back to the Hellenistic era, when Greek chroniclers claimed that Jews would fatten up a Greek for a year, then sacrifice him.
Her ruling in the Civil Court of Lisbon comes six years after the McCanns launched the libel action.
The first half is an energetic and sincere but rather swift overview of the blood libel in Christian culture, starting with Julius Streicher's revival of the blood libel in Nazi propaganda, especially Der Stuermer.
In this way, O'Brien's book is presented as a kind of indictment of Christian culture, showing how frequently the blood libel has been repeated; less important to O'Brien is the analysis of individual, local, or specific instances of the blood libel or a profound explanation of why the blood libel has, apparently, been such a durable fiction.
Mr Bates, 78, denied libel, but the judge ruled he had failed in his defences of justification and fair comment.
The same resentments are also encoded as sodomirical in several of the Jacobean poems and libels transcribed and re-transcribed into commonplace miscellanies, newsletters, and journals.
Anything Demon thinks may affect its appeal against the libel prosecution will be deleted, and offending subscribers may see their usenet access withdrawn.
"Internet On Trial" was how Vanity Fair's December issue billed its report on the libel lawsuit against Matt Drudge, the Internet's first political gossip columnist.
Mr Bates, 78, denied libel, pleading justification and fair comment, which was rejected.
In a legal challenge that may help change libel laws for all newspapers, the court said the damages "should be set aside".
(1) Every one who publishes a blasphemous libel is guilty of an indictable offence and liable to imprisonment for a term not exceeding two years.