libel


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libel

[lī′bəl]
Etymology: L, libellus, little book
a false accusation written, printed, or typewritten, or presented in a picture or a sign that is made with malicious intent to defame the reputation of a person who is living or the memory of a person who is dead, resulting in public embarrassment, contempt, ridicule, or hatred.

libel

(lī′bĕl) [L. libellus, little book, pamphlet]
Defaming the character of another by means of the written word. To qualify legally as libel, written communication must intentionally impugn the reputation of another person and be both malicious and demonstrably false.

libel (lī´bəl),

n 1. that which is written and published in order to injure the character of another by ridicule or contempt.
2. a defamation expressed by print, writing, pictures, or signs.
References in periodicals archive ?
When Trump first raised the topic of changing libel laws during his campaign last year, experts said that it would be difficult for two major reasons - first, libel law is administered at the state, not at the federal level, and secondly, even if Trump tried to push state legislatures to make changes, it would require a long time to get around the major 1964 Supreme Court precedent, according to (http://www.
The Anderson article in Penthouse, entitled "Open season on journalists," used the Point Reyes Light example, and several others, to make the case for a reform of American libel law.
Libel is defined under Article 353 of the Revised Penal Code as "a public and malicious imputation of a crime, or of a vice or defect, real or imaginary, or any act, omission, condition, status, or circumstance tending to cause dishonour, discredit or contempt of a natural or juridical person, or to blacken the memory of one who is dead.
The Defamation Bill, currently going through Parliament, provides a much simplified framework that will greatly reduce the cost of libel actions for plaintiffs and defendants alike.
Aside from this, the new law :"drastically increases the penalty for computer-related libel, with the minimum punishment raised 12-fold, from six months to six years.
The Speech Act that was passed unanimously by the US Congress and signed into law in the summer of 2010 protects American writers like me from the chilling effect of foreign libel laws.
20) These are only some of the many libel proceedings that generated concern about 'libel tourism'.
In this way, O'Brien's book is presented as a kind of indictment of Christian culture, showing how frequently the blood libel has been repeated; less important to O'Brien is the analysis of individual, local, or specific instances of the blood libel or a profound explanation of why the blood libel has, apparently, been such a durable fiction.
2) It is a question of fact whether or not any matter that is published is a blasphemous libel.
The distinction between the UK and the US attitude to libel has been much in the news recently.
He also spoke out in Parliament, which is exempt from libel laws, to "condemn the extensive financial links between Colonel Gaddafi and at least two British universities, the London School of Economics (LSE) and Liverpool John Moores".
A LIVERPOOL university has threatened an MP with libel proceedings - after he accused it of "accepting millions" from Libyan dictator Colonel Gaddafi Liverpool John Moores University could be heading for a High Court showdown with outspoken Conservative MP for Harlow, Robert Halfon.