lexical

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lex·i·cal

(leks'ĭ-kăl),
Denoting the vocabulary of speech or language.
Farlex Partner Medical Dictionary © Farlex 2012

lex·i·cal

(leks'i-kăl)
Denoting the vocabulary related to or describing speech or language.
Medical Dictionary for the Health Professions and Nursing © Farlex 2012
References in periodicals archive ?
Therefore, they concluded that the occurrence of generation effects is not contingent upon either lexicality or associative linkage.
The list's ability to signal plenitude as well as the strictly "needful," to be both ornament and "naked lexicality to articulate disciplinary as well as pleasurable potential, is recognized and wielded by the poet.
"futbolura" (footballness), then, the joint activation of morphological families of stems and of derivative suffixes should become decisive in determining letter-string lexicality. Thus, when stems are read we might assume that only those derivative suffixes which generate real words should be activated, not those that cannot be lexically concatenated with those stems.
Lexicality refers to the nature of the stimulus, which may be a word or a pseudoword (a pronounceable sequence of letters that has no meaning; Pinheiro & Rothe-Neves, 2001).
Until now the automation process was measured through reading accuracy and reading speed measured in reaction times (RTs), and almost all the outcomes from relatively transparent orthographies agree on the idea that larger length effects mean higher RTs, while the opposite occurs with lexicality or increasing frequency and orthographic neighborhood size.
Because the CaST contains both words and nonsense syllables, it permits a comparison of the effects of lexicality on consonant identification in ONH and YNH subjects.
Lexicality and stimulus length effects in Italian dyslexics: Role of the overadditivity effect.
When comparing grammaticalization processes and their results in Estonian and Finnish, Helle Metslang has shown that Estonian reveals a much higher degree of lexicality than Finnish, which has more synthetic and analytic grammatical devices and grammatical meanings.
Note that these types of resultative forms differ from one another in the degree of "lexicality" and "syntacticality" which they exhibit.
On the basis of De Cara and Goswami's proposals regarding monosyllables, Experiment 3 investigates the question of whether phonological superrime neighbourhood density will influence the phonology, lexicality or accuracy of response pattern in the disyllabic rhyme production task.