lexical

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lex·i·cal

(leks'ĭ-kăl),
Denoting the vocabulary of speech or language.

lex·i·cal

(leks'i-kăl)
Denoting the vocabulary related to or describing speech or language.
References in periodicals archive ?
Adv + Past Participle] The pattern, where the adverb modifies the verb, includes a number of lexicalised formations having well, long, ill as the first constituent (well-known, long-established, ill-judged), but is quite productive (socially-oriented, psychologically disturbed).
Especially for those expressions at the left boundary of the continuum, namely present participles of lexically stative predicates (especially predicates with lexicalised predication of qualities), and resultative perfect participles, which are most adjective-like, a decrease in analysability, whereby the participle acquires 'unit status' (cf.
The problem of identifying whether men is understood as an object or whether the form men-nan is globally lexicalised recurs here, but thanks to the speaker's interpretation, it becomes somewhat idle.
For all the extensions, apart from the long causative (namely -is-), applied, reciprocal, passive, denominative, neutro-passive and iterative extensions, significant numbers of lexicalised examples can be cited.
The Czech language corresponds to the last, the fully developed seventh stage of Berlin and Kay's scheme, which means that all eleven basic colour categories have been lexicalised.
Within the satellite-framed group, Kopecka (2006) examines the sort of fine-grained semantic notions lexicalised in English and Polish walking verbs.
In his 2003 paper Meibauer makes a distinction between PCs which have a lexicalised nonhead and PCs where the non-head is non-lexicalised, i.
For virtually all -er pairs that we examined, the default agentive reading of the noun is always possible, though it is not always lexicalised.
Note that we used the verb 'dance' instead of 'shoe-tap' in English as we wanted to use a lexicalised manner of motion.
In doing so, domains and sub-domains emerge in a more objective way, in order to represent those 'areas of meaning which are highly lexicalised in the societies in question and presumably of some importance to those societies' (Kay 1994: 42).
It might be argued that in the uses in (2) the nouns are perhaps even lexicalised as plural and collective expressions of a collection seen as a unity.
The only thing to be added is that this also implies that morphological processes of creating compound verbs in Bulgarian have fallen into disuse and the output constructions are characterized as lexicalised in Bauer & Huddleston's (2002: 1629) understanding of the polysemous term [lexicalization.