levocabastine


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Related to levocabastine: Ketotifen, Livostin, Olopatadine

levocabastine

 [le″vo-kab´ah-stēn]
an antihistamine applied topically to the conjunctiva as the hydrochloride salt to treat seasonal allergic conjunctivitis.
Miller-Keane Encyclopedia and Dictionary of Medicine, Nursing, and Allied Health, Seventh Edition. © 2003 by Saunders, an imprint of Elsevier, Inc. All rights reserved.

levocabastine

An ANTIHISTAMINE drug formulated as eye and nasal drops for the treatment of allergic CONJUNCTIVITIS and hay fever. A brand name is Livostin.
Collins Dictionary of Medicine © Robert M. Youngson 2004, 2005

antihistamine 

Any substance that reduces the effect of histamine or blocks histamine receptors, usually the histamine 1 (H1) receptor. It is used in the treatment of allergic conjunctivitis and also in the temporary relief of minor allergic symptoms of the eye. Common agents include antazoline sulfate, azelastine hydrochloride, cetirizine, chlorphenamine, emedastine, epinastine hydrochloride, ketotifen, levocabastine, loratadine and olopatadine. See hypersensitivity; mast cell stabilizers.
Millodot: Dictionary of Optometry and Visual Science, 7th edition. © 2009 Butterworth-Heinemann
References in periodicals archive ?
Introduction of reference drugs levocabastine and beclomethasone contributed to the reduction of nasal symptoms of AR in mice, which was reflected in a decrease in the number of sneezing and nasal grooming in relation to the NC group of animals in mice treated with levocabastine by 35.7% (p<0.05) and 51,6% (p<0.05), respectively, and in animals administered with beclomethasone--by 153.3% (p<0.05) and 104.3% (p<0.05), respectively.
Three of the newer antihistamines available for topical use are azelastine, levocabastine, and olopatadine.
Not all antihistamines are soporific - levocabastine, in the form of a nasal spray and eye drops, may give some relief in minutes and last up to 12 hours.
Topical ocular antihistamine-decongestants such as levocabastine and emadine can block histamine action at the [H.sub.1]- and [H.sub.2]-receptors in the conjunctiva, but do not slow the constant release of histamine from conjunctival mast cells.