marriage

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mar·riage

gamophobia.
Farlex Partner Medical Dictionary © Farlex 2012

marriage

The legal joining of two adults.
Segen's Medical Dictionary. © 2012 Farlex, Inc. All rights reserved.
References in periodicals archive ?
Gohar, who married a second time via the levirate practice, told us how difficult this was for both parties:
Junior levirate is allowed in many castes in the northern part of the state, but not in central and southern Maharastra.
It is important to note, though, that there is also mention of the custom of levirate marriage in eastern Francia.
Today, there are a number of marriages in the oldest generation of Warlpiri people alive at Yuendumu which came about through the levirate, however, I am not aware of a continuation of this practice by the younger generations.
The writer of the footnote was saying that God was more disturbed by Onan's refusal to carry out the Levirate law than because he "wasted his seed on the ground" in an unnatural act of contraception.
They also practic= e levirate marriage - not according to Muslim custom, which allows for vari= ous relatives of the deceased to marry a widow, whether or not she has chil= dren, but rather closer to Jewish custom, in that only brothers can marry o= nly childless-widows.
Does he have to perform halitsah (levirate marriage) on his late brother's wife, if this situation later arises?
This punishment, however, falls far short of the wrath expected against sinners in the hands of the angry God who turned Lot's wife to a pillar of salt for looking back to Sodom and Gomorrah (19.17-26), and who slew Onan for shirking his levirate duty when he instead spilt his seed on the ground (38.4-10).
4,563 (1480), as well as 4,845 (1485), the viceroy forces a Jew to free a widow from the obligation of Levirate marriage, in no.
Idu, the protagonist in the eponymous novel shattered convention by choosing death rather than succumb to a levirate marriage at the demise of her husband.
On levirate, see Tradition and Modernization, supra note 4 at 137-39.